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Full text of "Entre Nous 1943"






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PUBLISHEE BY THE 

STUDENTS at HOWARD 

COLLEGE 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 




• • • 



H D W A R D OIL 




GOES TD 



WAR. .«? 



o ^ 




«'' Comes to ^Moward L,ol(Pi 



In nineteen hundred and forty-three 
the reality of war clamped down upon 
our nation and rode our backs like the 
old man of the sea. Its poisoned tentacles 
seeped even into the relative peace and 
calm of our campus life and dragged us 
unto itself. One can hardly ignore a 
war that not only moves into one's 
house, but moves one out of it. 

Our campus has been reconstructed 
into a war production plant just as 
have most of the factories in our nation. 
The very buildings have been com- 
mandeered. The physical education 
course is no longer mere recreation. 
It toughens up men who will soon be 
going to all parts of the earth in all 
conditions and who must be physically 
fit to meet those conditions. The col- 
lege program has been speeded up. 
Pre-meds now make the four year 
stretch in three. The mathematics and 
science departments receive more at- 
tention, for Uncle Sammy can use 
boys and girls trained in these fields. 
The plea of the WAVES and WAACS 
for women trained in foreign langu- 
ages, English, physics, — yea even train- 
ed in anything — gives an impetus to in- 
terest in college work. No matter who 
you are or what you are studying it 
has developed that Uncle Saw needs 
you. 

But in spite of all the change and 
conversion into war-time exigencies, 
Howard College still maintains her 
firm belief in and hope for the Way 
of Peace, and Truth, and Light. We 
ply our hands to the task about us, 
but we lift our hearts to the dream 
that is tomorrow. 



75-^4463 



• • • 



L STUDENTS ±n 



When we first came hack tc 
school in the fall, a much more 
optimistic situation was appar- 
ent than was the actual case. 
The ratio of boys to girls was 
still greater in favor of the 
boys and so for a time we could 
believe that times had not 
langed greatly. Soon, however, 
representatives from the various 
branches of the service came 
to the campus to enlist the 
boys in the Reserve Corps. 
Each presented the propaganda 
in favor of his particular unit 
and left the boys to enlist in 
whichever appealed to them. 

Few of our students rushed 
pell-mell into the war, but 
there were some. One or two 




\ 



tL ARMED FORCES. 



of the preachers to avoid the 
stigma of pacifism gave them- 
selves up and were whisked 
away to the four corners of 
the earth. Most of the boys, 
however, realized that the gov- 
ernment could use trained men 
better than untrained ones and 
sought the grace of a little more 
time in the Reserves, trying to 
eke out one or two more months 
of college training. 

And so they left by ones 
and twos at first, but even the 
Reserves we have not with us 
always. When the time came, 
they left and great was the de- 
parture thereof. We miss each 
of them and pray Godspeed 
upon them. 




ker it U I J ^rnstmct L^iulu 



While the boys and girls contemplate in just 
what manner they will contribute to the war ef- 
fort, our busy professors are already mobilized. 
Defense classes held at night for civilians are 



taught by these men and women who already give 
so much to improve humanity, yet give again 
with no complaint when the need arises. 






and S H D D T tL F U N D A 




/, 



o 



Like most things that grow 
into some consequence our Navy 
program had a small beginning. 
In peace times there was only 
the Civil Pilots Training course 
which had as its purpose to 
teach civilians to fly and to en- 
able the.n to receive pilot's 
icenses. It was carried on in 
boration with the Munici- 
pal Airport. 

But changes have come. On 
July 1, 1942 this part-time 
C.P.T. became a full-time , 
course. Young Navy cadets in. 
the first phase of their train- 
ing came here to get basic 
training instruction. In Jan- 
uary the male students at Ren- 
froe were evacuated to make 
ioom for cadets who moved in. 

During the days of the 
C. P. T. Dr. Paty, our own 
professor of Physics, had the 
extra duty of supervising the 
whole program. More recently 
the program has grown to th» 
full-time Civil Aeronautics Au- 
thority and the first naval of- 
ficer, Lt. I. H. Mayfield, has 
come to assume charge. 



Dr. John R. Paty instructs classes in the 
first Civil Pilot Training. These are the 
classes of gruelling study in which there are 
no slackers and a failure means a "wash 
out." 



MENTALS... 
EMBRYO NAVY FLIERS. 



Boys who are in training in the Navy C. A. A. 
course at Howard receive their basic training. From 
here they go to pre-flight schools all over the country 
and then are ready for training at Pensacola or Corpus 
Christi. These are the embryo fliers and officers of 
a few years hence. 



A cadet won his wings 
in this little cub. 




Spring, fall, winter, and summer training on 

Berry Field this year is different. The Navy 

inaugurated a rigorous Physical Education 

course. Many will remember the joints that 
creaked for weeks as a result of it. 



THE BOYS ARE PUT THROUGH CALESTHENICS 







tU-Jedlcated . . 




In the hope of Peace 
through Truth . . . 



t 



o 



DR. JDHN XAN 



Because we find in him complete harmony of 
truths, because he embodies what we believe is 
knowledge of truth in science and does not scorn 
the holy truth of our religion, because he loves 
his Testament no less than his test tube, because 
he points his students who hardly recognize it 
to the highest truth in science and does not for- 
get the highest truth of all, because he is the 
paraclete between science and religion, because he 



said, "The first commandment is 'Subdue the 
earth'. By studying chemistry we learn to 
control and subdue the elements of the earth and 
thus carry out God's first command and fulfill 
his purpose for man on earth", making his science 
his religion and his religion his science, because 
of all these things and more, we lovingly dedicate 
this Entre Nuns to Dr. Xan. 



f 8 1 



Two years ago the CENTENNIAL FOR- 
WARD PROGRAM for the purpose of 
raising $5 00,000 to be used in paying the 
debt, constructing new buildings, and buying 
new property was launched. Dr. Reid was 
selected as vice-president in charge of the 
program. Under his able direction the pro- 
gram has thrived. $175,931 has been paid or 
subscribed, not including the $50,000 left 
the school by the late Crawford T. Johnson. 
$100,000 in cash has been paid up to date. 

The war came, making the construction of 
new buildings impossible, but this money has 
not remained idle. The new complexion in 
the form of white paint that the campus 
has taken on is one of the results of the 
Campaign. The debt has been refinanced, 
new property has been bought, general im- 
provements have been made. Since the Pro- 
gram was caught in the draft, so to speak, 
and is being held up for the duration, the 
opportunity to be both patriotic to our 
country and loyal to Howard has arisen. 
By buying War Bonds and giving them to 
the school, one can accomplish this double 
purpose. 




A. HAMILTON REID U*P**uLt 




Dr. H. J. Willingham, former president of 
Florence State Teacher's College, is shown 
presenting Dr. Reid with one of several 
one-hundred dollar War Bonds given by 
him to the CENTENNIAL FORWARD 
PROGRAM. Dr. Willingham was gradu- 
ated from Howard in 1892 and has shown 
an active interest in his Alma Mater. 

This picture is merely symbolic of the 
spirit of loyalty exhibited by the alumni, 
students, and friends in supporting How- 
ard College. 



[ 11 ] 




2). 



} ean 



P. P. BURNS 



Students at Howard College are at a disadvantage. When people come to view our campus, they 
say, "Where are the beautiful buildings? Where are fraternity and sorority rows? Show us what 
you have at Howard that makes you love her so." We can show them our campus but we cannot 
tell them what it means. They can sit with us under Sherman Oak, but it does not speak to them. 
We can show them our greatness in men like Dean Burns but how can we give them the spirit of 
the man as he gives it to us? 

The dean is a scholar, a teacher, an intellectual man, yet still a friend to every amazed spoho- 
more who finds that Chaucer was a real man. 

Dean Burns embodies many of the things that belong to Howard College. Few who graduate 
will ever forget the traditional Christmas address on books, the chapel introductions, the words of in- 
spiration in class and out with which he tried to fill our earthy beings with impressions ethereal. If 
you have need of historial data or tradition about the College, the dean is the man to approach. 

The love of the dean for Howard College is expressed in his own words, "When I die, give a yell 
for Howard over my coffin. If I fail to rise, you may shovel in the dirt." 



[ 12 ] 



<J-)ecm LI A L L 

Quick to attain popularity and tenacious 
in holding it is Dr. William Pratt Dale. The 
moment he arrived he became the most talked 
of member of the faculty, and remained so as 
he settled into his role of dean of men. Even 
yet the girls envy the boys in having such a 
pleasant and sympathetic counsellor. It did 
not take long for everyone on the campus to 
locate his office and concoct excuses, if no 
real ones presented themselves, to chat with 
him. Always interested and helpful, Dr. Dale 
has this reputation, "He can make that course 
in government interesting." 

Although he has been with us but a rela- 
tively short time, Dean Dale already has be- 
come a part of Howard College. He has ab- 
sorbed our spirit and contributed his until in 
short order the two have merged, and Dean 
Dale is Howard. 





2>. 



ean 



OBENCHAIN 

In her lofty ambition to "culturate" every 
freshman who comes to Howard and leaves, 
diploma in hand, Mrs. Obenchain is often un- 
successful, but her influence in the fine art 
of pouring tea has made us realize by the time 
we are seniors politer and more polished 
realms of society. She does her best to make 
true ladies of the girls and fill them with 
dreams of graciousness and charm. At least, 
she sets a noble example. 

Dean Obenchain is a part of that greatness 
of Howard that can not be explained and must 
be experienced. She shares with the other fac- 
ulty members the spirit of friendliness and help- 
fulness so peculiar to our campus, with the 
special office of being advisor to the girls. 



[ 13 ] 



Our F A C U 



OUR FACULTY consists of our friends. Students at 
Howard are particularly fortunate in the respect that we 
are in a position to have free and friendly association 
with our professors. The Howard spirit of friendliness 
and mutual helpfulness is well exhibited by this group. 
They are never too busy, too tired, nor too hungry to 
take time for our scholastic problems, and they even 
take an interest in our personal ones, giving us wise coun- 
sel in time of woe and weal. To these our teachers — 
teachers in the truest and noblest sense of the word — 
for their patience, their sincere effort, their understanding 
aid, we pause a moment in gratitude. 



Acton 
Bookman 
Brewster 
Brown 
Causey 
Chapman 
Counts 

Davison 
Dunham 
Greer 
guenther 
Hadley 
Hamrick 
Kess 

Ho LI. IDA Y 
HORTON 

Jacobs 
lunceford 
Martinson 
Moore 
Patty 

Richards 

Rothermel 

Sparks 

True 
V0\V_Cc5* 

WlLLOUGBY 

Xan 



HUL-CEE M. ACTON, A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages. 

MRS. GEORGE J. BOOKMAN. Hostess Renfroe Hall. 

LENT S. BREVCSTER, A.B., Assistant to the President. 

JULIA DOROTHY BROWN, A.B., M.S., Instructor in Mathematics. 

OSCAR S. CAUSEY, A.B., A.M., Professor of School Admit'istration. 

JAMES H. CHAPMAN, A.M., Th.M., Professor of Religious Education. 

MRS. MARGARET L. COUNTS, Manager of the Co-op. 

VERNON G. DAVISON, A.B.. Ph.D., Instructor in Religion and 
Greek. 

MYRA T. DUNHAM, A.B.. M.A., Instructor in Engl.sh. 

JAMES K. GREER, A.M., Ph.D., Professor of History. 




L T Y 



LOUIS C. GUENTHER, A.M., Registrar. 

WILLARD HADLEY, B.S. in Pharmacy, A.M., Ph.D., Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Chairman Pharmaceutical Chemistry Division. 

MRS. J. D. HAMRICK, Hostess Smith Hall. 

GEORGE W. HESS, A.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

MRS. B. C. HOLLIDAY, AC. A., Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 

RATHERINE HORTON, B.S., Instructor .n Physical Education. 

ELIZABETH JACOBS, A.B., M.S., Dietetics Dcpt. 

MRS. WILLIAM MABRY LUNCEFORD, Secretary to Vice-Presider t. 



MRS. KATHLEEN MARTINSON, B.S., Musical Instructor. 
JOHN B. MOORE, A.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
JOHN R. PATTY, B.S., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 
LEON W. RICHARDS, Ph.O, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Director of Phar- 
macy Department. 
JOHN F. ROTHERMLL, A.M., Professor of Journalism. 
ANTOINETTE SPARKS, A.M., Instructor in Dramatic Arts. 
WALLACE M. TRUE, A.M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 
MABEL WILLOUGHBY, A.B., A.B. in Library Science, librarian. 
JOHN XAN, M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 





P.mOPOSED_L IblVA mY HOWARD COLLEGE blMIAINGHAM ALA. " nm -\S&:Jh V i 1£ 

After the Duration 

BoaJ J T H U S T E E S 



W. A. Berry 

Virginia Life Insurance Co. 

John H. Buchanan 

Pastor Southside Baptist Church 

Peyton A. Eubank 

Real Estate & Insurance 

J. D. Heacock 

Physician 



J. LlNYER BEDSOLE 

Vice President, McKesson-Bedsole-Col- 
vin Drug Co., Mobile, Alabama 

Charles R. Bell 

President, Commercial National Bank, 
Anniston, Alabama 

Virgil Bouldin 

Supreme Court of Alabama, Montgom- 
ery, Alabama 

Lucien Burns 

Attorney and Mayor, Selma, Alabama 

Mrs. J. E. Franks 

Wife of Baptist Pastor, Fort Payne, 
Alabama 

Virgil Gardner 

Pastor, First Baptist Church, LaFayette, 
Alabama 



Crawford Johnson 

(Deceased) President, Coca-Cola Co. 

Mrs. Fuller Manly 

Wife of Real Estate & Insurance Man. 

J. D. PlTTMAN 

J. D. Pittman Tractor Co. 

OUT OF TOWN 
Hon. John Will Gay 

President, First National Bank, Scotts- 
boro, Alabama 

E. W. Hagood 

Pastor, First Baptist Church, Albert- 
ville, Alabama 

J. C. Inzer 

Attorney (Inzer, Martin & Suttle). 
Gadsden, Alabama 

H. J. KlTTRELL 

Kittrell-Milling Motor Co., Mobile, Ala- 
bama 

J. Renfroe Mullins 

Mullins Mercantile Co., Clanton, Ala- 
bama 



Memory L. Robinson 

Attorney 

Frank Samford 

President Liberty National Life Insur- 
ance Co. 

J. A. Ward 

Physician 



Louis H. Sessions 

President, Sessions Co., Enterprise, Ala- 
bama 

James T. Upchurch 

Secretary-Treasurer, Entcrstatc Oil, 

Montgomery, Alabama 

John J. Milford 

Pastor, First Baptist Church, Huntsville, 
Alabama 

R. E. Lambert, Jr. 

R. E. Lambert & Sons, Darlington, Ala- 
bama 

: Tom D. Russell 

Alexander City, Alabama 

*J. Theodore Jackson 

Attorney, Dothan, Alabama 



[ 16 ] 




c 



ASSES 




Classes held in Riley — Ethiopia to 11s — 
prepare our students for life — not death. 



\tma 



VL S E N I D H 



So, we're Seniors this year. Better go check 
with the Dean to be sure of the status quo. It's 
hard to believe it's almost over. 

Remember the time wc slipped out after 1 1 
and went walking in the moonlight? And the 
rows we had over tacking up signs the year the 
buildings were painted? — They made it plenty 
tough for us during initiation too. We got in 
on the tail-end of Howard-Southern football 
rivalry. Remember when the mock frats, MXM 
and Eta Beta were in their heyday? Just goes 
to show you what the war will do. — The preach- 
ers are not only speaking to the frats now, but 



due to the exigencies of circumstance have moved 
in with them. 

Four years can make a lot of difference some- 
how, especially if the last one has a war in it. 
It's tough to have to see our classmates gradually 
sifting out. Yeah, it's terrible to have them leave 
in ones and twos but when it comes to twenties 
you're just about ready to sign an armistice. 
There will be lots of us who won't get to walk 
up when our names are called on that great day 
in May, there'll just be silence. But we don't 
talk about that. 

Somehow elections have lost some of their ap- 




OFFICERS 

Presidents James Sharman 

Vice President Stanley Hand 

Secretary Bobbie Nichols Jordan 

Treasurer Lois Murphref Lee 



I D R CU 



Margaret Aldean Broadwell — Alpha Delta Pi 
Sorority — Biology — Y. W. C. A. Homewood. 
Ala. . . . Thomas Baxter Bryan, Jr. — Sigma Nu 
Fraternity 4 — Economics — Commander, Alpha 
Phi Omega; Student Senate 1; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 
3, 4; Ushers Club 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2. Elba, 
Ala. 

Clarke Elias Burkhalter — History — Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3; Ministerial Association 1, 2, 3; 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2; Entre Nous Staff, 2. 3; Jemi- 
son, Ala. . . . Mabel Pratt Burns — English — 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2; Entre Nous Staff 2, 3; Crim- 
son Staff 4; Booklovers 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

Alton Young Buzbee — English — Bessemer, 
Ala. . . . Helen Eugenia Cagle — Phi Mu Sor- 
ority — English — President Phi Mu Pledges 1 ; Sec- 
retary, Vice-President Phi Mu 2; First Vice-Presi- 
dent Phi Mu 3, 4; Art Club 1, 2; Kappa Pi; 
Who's Who 3, 4; Y. W. C. A.; Student Senate 
3, 4; Glee Club 3; Treasurer Kappa Pi. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

Oscar Milton Causey — Sigma Nu Fraternity, 
— History — Birmingham, Ala. . . John Y. Chris- 
topher — Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity — History — 
Football 1,2; Student Senate 2, 3; Vice-President 
"H" Club 4; Student Publications Board 4. But- 
ler, Ala. 

Mary Elizabeth Clapper — Beta Sigma Omicron 
Sorority Secretary — English — Rush Captain Beta 
Sigma Omicron Sorority; Treasurer Chi Delta Phi; 
Reporter Y. W. C. A.; Booklovers. Birmingham, 
Ala. . . . James Earl Coggin — History — B. S. 
U Council 2, 4; Ministerial Association; Secre- 
tary Ministerial Association 2; Vice-President 
Ministerial Association 3; President Ministerial 
Association 4; Mission Band 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 
2, 3, 4; Y. T. C. 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

Mary Louise Shirley Hodges — Phi Mu — Eng- 
lish, Journalist)/ — Hypatia; Masquers; Public Re- 
lations Staff, 1, 2, 3, 4; Director Public Rela- 
tions 2, 3; Birmingham Neu*s correspondent; Pi 
Kappa Theta; Honors Day; B. S. U. Council; 
Beauty Parade; University of Alabama 3; Chi 
Delta Phi. Birmingham, Ala. 
"Picture on Page 19. 



Senior etc 



class 



Broadwell 



Bryan 



Burkhalter 
Burns 




Cagle 



Clapper 

Coggin 



I 



VL SEN 



Cooper 



Cork 



Cox 



Crandall 



Davis 



Dowell 



Edfeldt 

Edwards 



Ellis 

Fitzpatrick 




Flonnie Turner Cooper — ^re-Medicine — Al- 
pha Epsilon Delta 2, 3, 4; Historian A. E. D. 3; 
Vice-President A. E. D. 4; Chi Alpha Sigma 
3, 4; Beta Pi Theta 4; Y. W. C. A. 2, 3, 4; 
Booklovers 2, 3. Birmingham, Ala. . . . Robert 
Francis Cork — Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity — Eco- 
nomics — Secretary 3, Treasurer 4, Pi Kappa 
Alpha; Men's Pan- Hellenic; Y. M. C. A.; Glee 
Club; A Cappella Choir. Birmingham, Ala. 



Carl L. Cox — Special — Pratt City, Ala. . . . 
Charles Houston Crandall — Sigma Nu Fra- 
ternity — Economics — Spring vi lie, Ala. 



Willie Jack Davis — History — Ministerial Asso- 
ciation; Alpha Phi Omega. Peterman, Ala. . . . 
Arthur Maultsby Dowell, Jr. — Pi Kappa Phi 
Fraternity — Chemistry — Historian, Pi Kappa Ph! 
4; Chi Alpha Sigma 2, 3, 4; Vice-President Chi 
Alpha Sigma 4; Chemistry Laboratory Instructor 

3, 4; Staff Photographer, Entre Nous 4; Alpha 
Phi Omega 4; Birmingham-Southern 1; Trident 

4. Birmingham, Ala. 



Ralph D. Edfeldt — Lambda Chi Alpha — Eco- 
nomics — Vice-President 3, President 4, Lambda 
Chi Alpha; Inter-Frat Representative 4; Y. M. 
C. A.; B. S. U. Larger Council; Alpha Phi Omega; 
Business Manager Bull Pup; Business Manager 
Crimson. Birmingham, Ala. . . . Elizabeth 
Shelton Edwards — Phi Mu Sorority — Journal- 
ism — Birmingham-Southern 1; Glee Club 2; Y. W. 
C. A.; Crimson Staff 3, 4; Editor Phi Mu; Entre 
Nous Staff 4; Publicity Director; Pi Kappa The- 
ta. Birmingham, Ala. 



John T. Ellis — Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity — Eco- 
nomics — Y. M. C. A. Birmingham, Ala. . . . 
Ruth Fitzpatrick — Economics. Birmingham, 
Ala. 



Una lAn'ded stated 



I D H 




ass 



Grady Fullerton, Jr. — Economics — Alpha 
Phi Omega, Treasurer and Vice-President; Treas- 
urer Student Body; Glee Club. Birmingham, Ala. 
. . . Frances Galbreath — Mathematics — Busi- 
ness Manager Crimson 3; Member Student Publi- 
cation Board 4; Crimson Staff 1, 2, 3, 4; Assistant 
Editor Bull Pup 2; Vice-President Freshman Com- 
mission 1; Y. T. C. 1, 2, 3; Booklovers 2, 3; 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 2, 3, 4; W. A. A. 1, 2, 3; 
Vice-President Y. T. C. 2; Entre Nous Staff 2; 
Editor and Business Manager Junior Edition of 
Crimson 3; Pi Kappa Theta Representative "H" 
Day 3; Editor of Crimson 4; Pi Kappa Theta 4; 
Secretary of A. A. U. W. 4. Birmingham, Ala. 

Robert Galbreath — Mathematics — A. D. 
Smith Mathematics Medal. Birmingham, Ala. . . . 
Mary Elizabeth Glover — Beta Sigma Omicron 
— English — Pledge Vice-President 2, Second Vice- 
President 3; Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A.; "H" Day 
Court 1; Larger B. S. U. Council 2; Assistant 
Rush Captain Beta Sigma Omicron 4. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

Martha Lou Gober — Beta Sigma Omicron, Vice- 
President— History— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Y. 
W. A. 2, 3, 4; Booklovers Club 1, 2; Intra- 
mural Sport Council; Pan-Hellenic Council 2, 3, 4; 
President of Beta Sigma Omicron. Birmingham, 
Ala. . . . Doris Ruth Godwin — Biology — Stu- 
dent Senate 3, 4; Alpha Epsilon Delta 3,4; Presi- 
dent Alpha Epsilon Delta 4; A Cappella Choir 1, 
2, 3; Y. W. C. A.; Chi Alpha Sigma 3, 4; Beta 
Pi Theta 3, 4; Scholarship Day 1, 2, 3; Vice- 
President Girls' Glee Club 2; President Hypatia 
4. Birmingham, Ala. 

Kermit Gore — Religion — Ohatchie, Ala. . . . 
Delouise Granade — Phi Mu Sorority — Sociology 
— Y. W. C. A.; Beauty Parade 3. Frank viile, 
Ala. 

G. Carl Green — Religions Education — Minis- 
terial Association 1, 2, 3, 4; B. S. U. Council 3; 
Glee Club 4. Decatur, Ala. . . . Ira E. Gunn, 
Jr. — Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity — Economics — Glee 
Club 1, 2; A Cappella Choir 1, 2; President Pi 
Kappa Phi 4; Pan-Hellenic Council 2, 3; Crim- 
son Staff 4; Entre Nous Staff. Birmingham, 
Ala. 




Fullerton 
Galbreath 



Galbreath 

Glover 



Gober 



Godwin 



Gore 



Granade 



Green 



Gunn 



r/at/tA has 



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id 



approved our pre-med course 



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Gwin 



Hagood 



Mm 



Hand 



Hinkle 



Howell 



Johnson 




Langley 

Lawrence 



VL SEN 



Carey Gwin — Pi Kappa Phi — Biology — President 
3, 4; Alpha Phi Omega, President 4; Chi Alpha 
Sigma; Alpha Epsilon Delta; President Sopho- 
more Class; Pan-Hellenic Council 2; Religious 
Focus Week Committee 2, 3; Student Publication 
Board 3 ; Student Senate 4. Sumiton, Ala. . . . 
Horace M. Hagood — Pi Kappa Alpha — Eco- 
nomics — Pinson, Ala. 



Stanley D. Hand — Pi Kappa Alpha — Biology — 
President 3, 4; Vice-President Senior Class. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. . . . Helen Hinkle — Alpha Delta 
Pi Sorority — English — Vice-President Alpha Delta 
Pi Sorority 3; Judson 1, 2; Y. \V. C. A. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 



Sara Virginia Howell — Delta Zeta — Biology — 
Laboratory Instructor; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; 
Cabinet Member 1, 2, 3; Booklovers 1, 2, 3; 
Entre Nous Staff, 1,2; Crimson Staff 2; Pi Tau 
Chi 2, 3; Wesley Foundation, Secretary 3; His- 
torian of Junior University Women. Birming- 
ham, Ala. . . . Miley Kimball Johnson — Sigma 
Nu Fraternity — English — Lieutenant Commander 
4; Ministerial Association; B. S. U. Council 2. 
Union Springs, Ala. 



Martha Johnson — Phi Mu Sorority — English — 
Registrar; Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. A. Oxford, Ala. 
. . . Mrs. Claire Koller — English — University 
of Miami 1, 2, 3. Miami, Fla. 



Josephine Vivian Langley — English — B. S. U. 
First, Second, Third Vice-President 2, 3, 4; Dor- 
mitory Council 2, 3, President 4; Y. W. A.; 
Glee Club. Camp Hill, Ala. . . . Kimsey Kf.llon 
Lawrence — Sigma Nu Fraternity — Pharmacy — 
Kappa Upsilon, Regent; Football; "H" Club; 
Pharmacy Club. Selma, Ala. 



^r4oivard L^olu 



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William Mabry Lunceford — English — Presi- 
dent of Ministerial Association; Trident. Lanett, 
Ala. . . . Kaye Mark.ee — Pre-Medicine — Y. W. 
C. A.; Wesley Foundation; Booklovers; Alpha 
Epsilon Delta; Chi Delta Phi; W. A. A.; Glee 
Club; A Cappella Choir; President Booklovers; 
Vice-President W. A. A.; Crimson Staff. Jack- 
sonville, Fla. 

Julius Garnett Mooney — Pi Kappa Alpha — 
Economics — Treasurer 4; Band 1; Student Senate 
4; Intramural Sports; Football; Basket Ball; Soft- 
ball 3, 4. Wylam, Ala. . . . Lois Murphree — Phi 
Mu Sorority — English — Vice-President 3, Presi- 
dent 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Pan-Hellenic Rep- 
resentatives 3, 4; Vice-President of Sophomore 
Class; Vice-President Senior Class; Masquers. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Frank Edmond McAnnally — Pre-Medicine — 

Birmingham-Southern 1 ; Biology Laboratory In- 
structor 4. New Castle, Ala. ... Paul Moor 
McCullough — Economics — Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 
3; Band 1, 2; Orchestra 3; Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Birmingham, Ala. 

Frances Arthur McDaniel — Delta Zeta — 
Biology and English — R.N. Graduate of St. Vin- 
cent's Hospital 1940; Women's Student Govern- 
ment, President 4; Vice-President 3, President 2, 
Chi Delta Phi; Booklovers 1, 2, 3; Y. W. C. A. 1, 
2, 3, 4; Entre Nous Staff 2, 3; Crimson 2, 3, 4; 
W. A. A. 1, 2; Junior A. A. U. W.; Beauty Pa- 
rade 2, 3; Outstanding Girl 3. Birmingham, Ala. 
. . . Kitty Wynn McIntosh — Alpha Delta Pi 
Sorority — English — Judson 1, 2; Secretary 4; Y. 
W. C. A. Birmingham, Ala. 

Charles Edward Niager — History and Eco- 
nomics — Crimson Staff 4; Entre Nous 3, 4; In- 
ternational Relations Club 4. Atlanta, Ga. . . . 
Bobbie Gwendolyn Nichols — Beta Sigma Omi- 
cron — English — Pledge Secretary 1, Treasurer 2, 
Vice-President 3, 4; Treasurer Senior Class; Kappa 
Pi, Treasurer 2, Secretary 3, 4; Beta Pi Theta, 
President 3, 4; Y. W. C. A., Group Leader 1; 
W. A. A.; Beauty Parade 1; "H" Day Program 
Design 2; Presbyterian Student Association; Sec- 
retary Hypatia. Birmingham, Ala. 



in 



key histor 



:/ 




LUNCEFORD 



Mark.ee 



Mooney 

Murphree 



McAnnally 



McCullough 



M4cM 




McDaniel 
McIntosh 



Niager 



Nichols 



I 



VL SEN 



Parker 

Peeples 



Pfaff 



Popi 



Prince 



Provo 



Quin 
Richardson 



Sharman 

Sinclair 




£ 



Robert Franklin Parker — Economics — Tri- 
dent 4; President Trident 4; Student Auditor 4; 
B. S. U. Council 3; Honor's Day 3; Y. M. C. A. 
Lafayette, Ala . . . Sarah Peeples — History — 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. Birmingham, Ala. 



William Frederick Pfaff — Pi Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity — Pharmacy — Pharmacy Club. Birming- 
ham, Ala. . . . Milton Hart Pope — English — 
Alpha Phi Omega; Ministerial Association; B. S. 
U. Birmingham, Ala. 



Betty Elveree Prince — Delta Zeta Sororitv — 
Economics — Corresponding Secretary 3 ; Treasurer, 
4; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 1, 2; B. S. U. Council 2; 
Secretary of Freshman Class; Treasurer of Sopho- 
more Class; Secretary of Women's Student Gov- 
ernment; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; A Cappella Choir 
1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Religious Focus 
Week Committee 2, 3; Crimson Staff 3, 4; Entre 
Nous Staff 3, 4; Student Senate 4. Birmingham, 
Ala. . . . Wilford Morris Provo — English — 
B. S. U. Council; Y. M. C. A.; Mission Group; 
A Cappella Choir, Glee Club; Ministerial Associa- 
tion. Birmingham, Ala. 



Hugh Langdon Quin — Lambda Chi Alpha, Sec- 
retary — Journalism — Howard Crimson 1, 3, 4; 
Assistant Editor of Entre Nous 4; Track 2; Pi 
Kappa Theta. Birmingham, Ala. . . . John 
Blair Richardson — Sigma Nu Fraternity — Eco- 
nomics — Football 1, 2, 3; "H" Club, Treasurer 3; 
Student Council 3; Delta Kappa 1, 2; President 
of Inter-Fraternity Council 4. Cortelyou, Ala. 



James Edward Sharman — Sigma Nu Fraternity 
—Biology— Football 1, 2, 3; Y. M. C. A.; Treas- 
urer, Y. M. C. A.; Vice-President "H" Club 3; 
President "H" Club 4; President Junior Class; 
President Senior Class; B. S. U. Council; Inter- 
national Relations Club; Basket Ball Manager; 
Director of Intramurals; Sports Editor of Crim- 
son; Air Raid Warden. Lafayette, Ala. . . . 
Alister Sinclair — History — Ministerial Associa- 
tion. Birmingham, Ala. 



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9 



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ass 



Billy Alton Smith — Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity — 
Chemistry — Chi Alpha Sigma, Secretary Treasur- 
er 2, President 3; Trident 4; Laboratory Assistant. 
Birmingham, Ala. . . . Clyde Chalmus Thagard 
— Pharmacy — Pharmacy Club. Brantley, Ala. 

Myrtice Thomason — Economics — A Cappella 
Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A. 3, 4; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Crimson Staff 3, 4. Tar- 
rant. Ala. . . . Carolyn Armenia Thornton — 
Delta Zeta Vice-President 3 — Dietetics — Freshman 
"Y" Cabinet 1 ; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. 
A. Cabinet 3; Dietetics Club 2, 3, 4, President 2; 
President Delta Zeta Sorority 4; Pan-Hellenic 
Council 3; President Pan-Hellenic Council 4. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

J. Carroll Trotter — Lambda Chi Alpha Fra- 
ternity — English — Band 1; Alpha Phi Omega; 
Ministerial Association 3, 4; Co-Chairman Relig- 
ous Focus Week 3; Masquers 3; "Gail Patrick Dra- 
matic Award" 3; Trident 4; President of Student 
Body 4; Candidate for Degree with Honors 4; 
Who's Who, Most Popular Boy; Beta Pi Theta; 
Who's Who in American Colleges and Universi- 
ties. Birmingham, Ala. . . . Mildred Vann — 
Economics— W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Vance Oral Vernon — English — Member In- 
tramural Council; Ministerial Association; Head 
Cheer-Leader 3; B. S. U. Council 2, 3; Masquers 
Club. Alexander City, Ala. . . . Harvey Wat- 
son Ward, Jr. — Sigma Nu — Economics — Lt. 
Commander 2, Commander 3, Treasurer 4. Oak- 
man, Ala. 

Steven Dudley Watkins — History — Masquers 
Club 4; Business Manager Crimson 3; Crimson 
Staff, Feature Writer 4; Crimson Staff 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Birmingham, Ala. . . . Dorothy Weathers — 
Beta Sigma Omicron Sorority — English — Y. W. 
C. A. 2, 3. 

Carl F. Whirley — English — Ministerial Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 2, 3; Glee Club 
2, 3, 4; A Cappella Choir 2, 3, 4; Ushers Club 3. 
Bagdad, Fla. . . . Barbara Woods — Economics — 
A Cappella Choir; Glee Club; W. A. A. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 




Smith 



Thagard 



Thomason 



Thornton 



Trotter 



Vann 



Vernon 



Ward 



Watkins 

Weathers 



Whirley 

Woods 



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I 



VL J U N I D R 



The two hundered or so freshmen who en- 
rolled in Howard in September, 1940, caused no 
great stir. They were no different from ninety- 
eight other classes that had enrolled before them. 
More modern? Only to the extent that this na- 
tion was on the verge of entering another World 
War. 

They cheered Howard's Bulldogs to two foot- 
ball triumphs at Legion Field. They gave campus 
politics a wait-till-next-year nod and took final 
examinations, passing most, failing some — just 
as their predecessors did. 

In the sophomore year the "A" students began 



to stand forth, received the plaudits of Dean 
Burns and sat through or enjoyed his English Lit 
classes. The first few of us went off in far- 
from-dramatic fashion to military camps. 

By September, 1942, the "200" had simmered 
to little more than 100. Football was gone. The 
first semester passed and with it many juniors, to 
the army, navy and marines. And in the second 
semester, they kept going — only now in groups. 

Of those 200 freshmen of 1940 there were 
now about fifty juniors to enter the final round 
in September, 1943. 

That's our class up to now. Glorious? Hardly. 



OFFICERS 

President Charles McEachern 

Vice President Delouise Granade 

Secretary Carolyn Garrick 

Treasurer Billy Stephenson 




You've never heard 
of Thomasville! 

Just Ask me. 



L L I\ J J — ^nformailu . . . 




Renfroe Hal 

The same, a different view 

Pastorizers 

Hey, wait a minute, fellas. 



Unforgettable? Perhaps for two or three years. 
Colorful? We saw the buildings painted white. 
But Happy? You bet, Being collegiate, we get 
our education through association, our happiness 
through fellowship. 

Write down that number, won't you, so may- 
be sometime in the future you can remember 
us — Class of '44. 



She thinks 
she's a rat. 



1 



von 



Allen 
Anderson 
Anderton 



August 
Ballard 
Barnls 



Beaird 
Bee 
Bee 



Bennett 
Bennett 
Boozer 



Burns 
Charles 
Clem mi r 



Cobb 
Cooper 
Coshatt 



Countryman 
Counts 
Dasher 



Denham 
Dodo 

Eddleman 




JUNIORS 



RUTH ALLEN— Delta Zeta— English— Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet; Chi Delta Phi; Glee Club 1, 2. Birmingham, 
Ala. . . . CECELIA ANDERSON— Delta Zeta— Eng- 
//s/j— Birmingham, Ala. . . . MARTHA ANDF.RTON 
— English — "H" Day Queen; President of Masquers 
Miss Howard; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. Birmingham, Ala. 

PHILLIP AUGUST— P, Kappa Phi— Pharmacy — Pharm- 
acy Club. Birmingham, Ala. . . . HENRY BALLARD 
— Pi Kappa Phi — Economics. Alexander City, Ala. . . . 
HAROLD BARNES— English— B. S. U. Council; Min- 
isterial Association; Library Staff. Montgomery, Ala. 



WILLIAM BEAIRD 
Birmingham, Ala. . 



Lambda Chi Alpha — Economics — 
ALON BEE— Pi Kappa Alpha— 
English — Birmingham, Ala. . . . ANNA MARGARET 
COTDEN BEE — Beta Sigma Omicron — Economics — 
Secretary of Women's Pan-Hellenic Council; Y. W. 
C. A. Birmingham, Ala. 

JANE COOK BENNETT— Phi \\u—Englis/>— Kappa 
Pi Art Fraternity. Birmingham, Ala. . . . MILDRED 
BENNETT — Biology. Birmingham, Ala. . . . HOW- 
ARD BOOZER— Economics. Hartselle, Ala. 

EEAGIN A. BURNS, JR.— Pi Kappa Alpha— Pharm- 
acy. Tarrant City, Ala. . . . HARRY CHARLES— 
Biology, Chemistry — Physics Laboratory Instructor; A. 
L. Smith Mathematics Award. Birmingham, Ala. 
CAROLYN CLEMMER— Alpha Delta V\—Englhly— 
Y. W. C. A.; Treasurer of Alpha Delta Pi. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

HERMAN W. COBB — Religions Education — Chairman 
of Program Committee and Vice-President Ministerial 
Association; A Cappella Choir 1, 2; Glee Club; Crimson 
Staff; Alpha Phi Omega; Masquers. Birmingham, Ala. 
. . . CARL COOPER— Pi Kappa Alpha— Biology — "H" 
Club 2, 3; Student Senate 3; Intramural Council 3; 
Men's Pan-Hellenic Council 3; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Clanton, Ala. . . . ESTA BELL COSHATT— Delta 
Zeta — Social Science — Y. W. C. A. Council; Dormitory 
Council. Trussville, Ala. 

JAMES COUNTRYMAN— Economics. Birmingham, 
Ala. . . . SARAH MARGARET' COUNTS— Economics 
— Booklovers; Orchestra; Alabama College 1. Birming- 
ham, Ala. . . . JACK DASHER— Pi Kappa Phi— 
Pharmacy — Emory University Atlanta College of Pharm- 
acy 2. Wauchula, Fla. 

ALVIN DENHAM— Pi Kappa Alpha— journalism— H- 
Club; Basket Ball I, 2, 3; Entre Nous Staff. Alexan- 
der City, Ala. . . . JOHN EUGENE DODD— History 
— Alpha Phi Omega; Entre Nous Staff; B. S. U. 
Council; Ministerial Association. Scmmcs, Ala. . . . 
ELVIA EDDLEMAN, JR.— Pi Kappa Phi— Pre-Medi- 
cine — Alpha Epsilon Delta; A Cappella Choir 2, 3; 
Chemistry Laboratory Assistant. Birmingham, Ala. 



^jrirst hue basketball 



a 



i 



HOWARD 



DERIC EDGAR— Lambda Chi Alpha — Chemistry — Al- 
pha Phi Omega; Basketball 1, 2, 3; H-Club. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. . . . HILDRED ELLIS — Business Ad- 
ministration — Y. W. C. A.; Snead Junior College 1, 2. 
Attalla, Ala. . . . CAROLYN WARD EPPERSON— 
Beta Sigma Omicron — Economics — Treasurer Beta Sigma 
Omicron 3; Warden Beta Sigma Omicron 2, 3. Home- 
wood, Ala. 

ABE EVSM AN— Economics— Basketball 1, 2, 3. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. . . . JOE ESHELMAN, JR.— Chemistry. 
Birmingham, Ala. . . . MARY K. FINLEY— Biology— 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 2, 3; Vice-President Freshman 
Commission; W. A. A.; Wesley an Foundation Vice- 
President 2, Secretary 3; Biology Laboratory Instruc- 
tor; Crimson Staff I, 2, 3; Society Editor Crimson 2; 
Fntre Nous Staff 2. Homewood, Ala. 

WHEELER FLEMMING— Lambda Chi Alpha— Eco- 
nomics — Basketball I, 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2. Birming- 
ham, Ala. . . . SARAH FLORENCE— Alpha Delta Pi— 
English — Glee Club; Y. W. C. A.; Corresponding Sec- 
retary Alpha Delta Pi. Birmingham, Ala. . . . NELLIE 
FRIEL — Chemistry — Chi Alpha Sigma 2, 3; Secretary- 
Treasurer 3; Y. W. C. A. !, 2, 3; W. A. A. 1, 2, 3; 
Booklovers 1, 2; Chemistry Laboratory Assistant 2, 3. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

CAROLYN GARRICK— Sociology— Y. W. C. A. Cabi- 
net 2, 3; W. C. V.; B. S. U. Council 2, 3; Secretary 
Junior Class; Wittiest Girl 3; Crimson Staff 3; Mission 
Band; Y. W. A.; Dormitory Council. Thomasville, Ala. 
. . . EFRO GATSIS— Delta Zeta— Soi iology — Y. W. C. 
A.; Booklovers; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. Birmingham, Ala. 
. . . CLAYTON GILBERT— History— Glee Club; Min- 
isterial Association; Masquers. Cordova, Ala. 

JIMMY GOODLETT— Pi Kappa Alpha— Business Ad- 
ministration. Red Level, Ala. . . . MARGENE GRA- 
HAM — Sociology — Alpha Epsilon Delta; Y. Si'. C. A.; 
Scholarship Metal. Bessemer, Ala. . . . MARY FRAN- 
CES HAYS — Delta Zeta — Biology. Birmingham, Ala. 

MILTON HODGES— Pi Kappa Alpha— History — Foot- 
ball 1. 2; H-Club. Powderly, Ala. . . . JAMES H. 
HOLLFY, JR. — History. Birmingham, Ala. . . . 
DAVID SANKEY HOMAN— Religion— Y. M. C. A.; 

Ministerial Association. Cordova, Ala. 

OSCAR LEE HURTT, JR.— Chemistry— Alpha Phi 
Omega; Chi Alpha Sigma 1, 2, 3; Irondale, Ala. . . . 
EDWARD L. JACKSON— English — Ministerial Asso- 
ciation. Marion, Ala. . . . JOHN JEFFERS — Religion. 
Tarrant City, Ala. 

RALPH JOHNSON— Economics— Kappa Pi; Alpha Phi 
Omega; B. S. U. Council; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2. Fort 
Payne, Ala. . . . PAUL KLUGE— RW/,?ro»— Track 1, 2; 
A Cappella Choir 2, 3; Glee Club 2, 3; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3. Birmingham, Ala. . . . JOE BILL 
KNOWLES — History — Mission Band; Ministerial Asso- 
ciation; Glee Club; Y. M. C. A. Headland, Ala. 




Edgar 
Ellis 

Epperson 



Epsman 
eshelman 

FlNLEY 



Humming 
Florence 
Frill 



Garrick 
Gatsis 
Gilbert 



Goodlett 
Graham 
Hays 



Hodges 
Holley 
Homan 



HURTT 

Jackson 
Jeffers 



Johnson 
Kluge 

Knowles 



plauers this u 



ear were from 



the 



'unior class 



la 



Lane 
Lee 



Lipscomb 



Loftin 
Lovtrf.y 
Mathews 



Meadows 
Medlin 
Mehaffey 



Milam 
Monroe 
Murphy 



McClain 
McCool 

McCuLLOUCH 



McEachern 
McEachern 
McKnight 



McLeod 
McNeil 
McRae 



Nolan 
Parson 
Pierce 




VL J U N 



WILFORD LANE— Pi Kappa Phi— History. Clanton, 
Ala. . . . JIMMY LEE— Pi Kappa Alpha— History— 
Inter-Fraternity Council. Chattanooga, Te.nn. . . 
VIRGINIA LIPSCOMB — Delta Zeta — Englisl^- Pan- 
Hellenic Council; Secretary of Delta Zeta; Y. W. C. A. 
Scottsboro, Ala. 

SAM LOFTIN— Pi Kappa Phi— Pharmacy. Hartford, 
Ala. . . . DAN LOWREY— Pi Kappa Phi— Chemistry 
— Laboratory Assistant. Birmingham, Ala. . . . 

JANE MATHEWS— Beta Sigma Omicron— E nglish— 
President Beta Sigma Omicron; Y. W. C. A. Bir- 
mingham, Aia. 

ANITA MEADOWS— Delta Zeta— Dietetics— Y. W. C. 
A.; Dietetics Club. Birmingham, Ala. . . . EDNA 
JO MEDLIN— Alpha Delta Pi— Mathematics— Glee 
Club; A Cappella Choir; Vice-President Masquers; Y. 
W. C. A. Birmingham. Ala. . . . VIRGINIA ME- 
HAFFEY— Phi Mu — Sociology — Treasurer Phi Mu: Y. 
W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Booklovers 1, 2; A Cappella Choir 
1, 2, 3; B. S. U. Council 3. Birmingham, Ala. 

MARY JUANITA MILAM— Phi Ma— Music— Kappa Pi: 
Y. W. C. A.; Vice-President Kappa Pi; International Re- 
lations Club. Birmingham, Ala. . . . MARGARET' LEE 
MONROE — Phi Mu — History — Secretary Sophomore 
Class Masquers; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Entre Nous Staff; 
Cheer Leader; Second Vice-President Phi Mu. Birming- 
ham, Ala. . . . JANE MURPHY— Delta Zeta— Eco- 
nomics — Y. W. C. A.; Masquers. Birmingham, Ala. 

HOWARD McCLAIN— Lambda Chi Alpha— Pharmacy 
—Pharmacy Club. Gadsden, Ala. . . . ELIZABETH 
McCOOL— Pharmacy— Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A. 1, 2, 3; 
Booklovers I, 2; Crimson Staff 3; Entre Nous Staff 2. 
Fairfield, Ala. . . . MIRIAM McCULLOUGH— Spanish 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; W. A. A.; Dietetics Club 2; 
Booklovers; Crimson Staff 3. Birmingham, Ala. 

CHARLES McEACHERN— Pi Kappa Alpha— Econom- 
ics — Men's Pan-Hellenic Council 2; President Pi Kappa 
Alpha 2; President Junior Class, Birmingham, Ala. . . . 
CRATON McEACHERN— Economics. Lanett, Ala. 
. . . ELIZABETH McKNIGHT— Drr/cZ/rs— Alabama 
College 1, 2; A Cappella Choir 3; Glee Club. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

ANNETTE McLEOD— English— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; 
W. C. V.; Y. W. A. 1, 2, 3; Booklovers 1; B. S. U. 
Council 2. Mobile, Ala. . . . SARA McNEIL— English 
Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association; Booklovers. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. . . . DONALD McRAE— History— 
Ministerial Association. Mobile, Ala. 

JACK NOLAN— Sigma Nu — Chemistry. Tarrant City, 
Ala. . . . KATHLYNN PARSON— Alpha Delta Pi— 
Pharmacy — Y. W. C. A.; Dormitory Council; Secre- 
tary Pharmacy Club. Haleyville, Ala. . . . PHOEBE 
PIERCE — English. Birmingham, Ala. 



^rntramural Sports 



sports proa 



roaram was 



deslaned tki 



is uear 



7 



IDRS at HOWARD 



JOHN PITTMAN— ErOHO»;/o— Alpha Phi Omega; B. 
S. U. Council; Vice-President Student Body 3; Presi- 
dent Alpha Phi Omega 2. Birmingham, Ala. . . . 
MARY DUNLAP PLUNKEfT— English— Y. W. C. A. 
1, 2, 3. Hanceville, Ala. . . . JACOB HUBERT RAY 
—Religion^-Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Mission Band 1, 2, 3; 
Ministerial Association Second Vice-President; Y. M. 
C. A. Chaplain. Gordo, Ala. 



BOBBIE REINHARDT— Englisly— H-Day Program; Y. 
W. A.; Y. W. C. A. Wilsonville, Ala. . . . URAL 
MARGIS ROBINSON — Chemistry — Business Manager 
Entre Nous. Birmingham, Ala. . . . CLARENCE WES- 
LEY SLAUGHTER — Mathematics — Basketball. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 



JACK SNOW— Pi Kappa Phi— Pharmacy — Atlanta Col- 
lege of Pharmacy. Copperhill, Ala. . . . GLADYS 
STAMPS — Economics. Center Point, Ala. . . . BILLY 
STEPHENSON— Religion. Hartselle, Ala. 



GERALD TIDWELL— English— Glee Club; Orchestra 
1; Alpha Phi Omega; Crimson Staff; B. S. U. Coun- 
cil 2; Y. M. C. A. 1,2; Ministerial Association. Mont- 
gomery, Ala. . . . JOHN TINKLEPAUGH— Pi Kappa 
Alpha — Pharmacy. Birmingham, Ala. . . . JOHN 
TOWNSEND— History — H-Club; Student Senate 2, 3. 
Hartselle, Ala. 



EUNICE WARD— Phi Mu— Economics— Y. W. C. A.; 
W. C. V.; Dietetics Club. Birmingham, Ala. . . . MAR- 
GARET WARD— Alpha Delta Pi— English— President 
Alpha Delta Pi; President Girls' Glee Club; Vice-Presi- 
dent Beta Pi Theta; Secretary Masquers; Treasurer Pan- 
Hellenic; A Cappella Choir; Y. W. C. A. Birmingham, 
Ala. . . . DOC S. WESSON, JR.— Economics— Alpha 
Phi Omega; Glee Club; A Cappella Choir; Basketball; 
Track; Entre Nous Staff. Birmingham, Ala. 



JEAN WEST— Mathematics— Y. W. C. A.; B. S. U. 
Council. Birmingham, Ala. . . . ERNEST WHEELER 
— Religion — Ministerial Association. Five Points, Ala. 
SARA WILLIAMS— Economic*— Y. W. C. A. Council 
2, 3; B. S. U. Council; Crimson Staff 3; Entre Nous 
Staff; Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Thomasville, Ala. 



ROBERT WOODDY — History — Secretary Student 
Body; Y. M. C. A.; Ministerial Association. LaFayette, 
Ala. . . . CALVIN C. WOODS— Pi Kappa Phi— 
Pharmacy — Pharmacy Club. . . . CATHRYNE WORD 
— Sociology — Dietetics Club; Freshman Commission; 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Booklovers 1, 2; President W. 
C. V. 2; President W. A. A. 3; B. S. U. Council 2, 3; 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 3. Shawmut, Ala. 



to build kea 




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A\^ 



PlTTMAN 

Plunkett 
Ray 




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Reinhardt 
Robinson 
Slaughter 



Snow 
Stamps 

Stephenson 



Tidwell 

TlNKLEPAUGH 

Townsend 



Ward 
Ward 
Wesson 



West 

Wm l i er 
Williams 



Wooddy 
Woods 
Word 



I 



VL SDPHDMDRE 



The world has laughed at the expense of sophomores 
long enough. The energetic and high-minded class of '4 5 
is tired of the ridicule and wishes to clarify a few points. 
No other class has received the slurring remarks that 
sophomores have suffered. 

Tho' freshmen are called "green" and "rat"; and are 
put through the tortures of initiation, they are the pets 
of the campus. Profs, understanding that they have to 
adjust themselves to college, give frosh just enough work 
to make them complain. 

Juniors are branded by no particular trait. 

And seniors — oh, well, everybody knows how respectable, 
how industrious, how careworn seniors are. 

But the sophomores! All too long cruel jokes have ac- 
cused them of assuming a blase attitude and misinforming 
wide-eyed freshmen. They plead innocent to this charge. 
But even if one did occasionally inform an amazingly 
ignorant freshman of some vital — well, useful — facts, his 
spirit of helpfulness is not too hard to understand. It is 
only human to try to help a homesick babe over a few 
rough places. 



And there is the other charge of assuming all-wisdom 
while displaying all-ignorance. In any class there is admit- 
tedly a minority of those who are not all they think 
themselves, but sophomores seem to be the butt of all of 
the unjest justs. 

Besides the ordinary peacetime hardships to which sopho- 
more classes are subjected, the class of '4S has had an 
added burden. Memories of losses linger. Among the first 
and foremost losses sustained was that of our class presi- 
dent, Tom Collins, who decided he wanted to fly with 
the Navy. His going suggested to the Uncle that Howard's 
sophomore class had men in it, so month by month he 
took steps to alleviate the situation. The class is not only 
scattered over the city of Birmingham but is rather sparsely 
represented over the entire globe. However, Uncle Samuel 
left diamonds for some and unwavering hope for others. 

In fact, there is hope for the entire class. For just as 
a class changes from naive babes to world weary sophists, 
so the latter undergo the natural metamorphosis to sturdy 
juniors. 



OFFICERS 

President Jon Crow 

Vice President Bill Culbreth 

Secretary „ Darlene Franklin 

Treasurer Howard Sisson 





r"* 



_ 






L L A J J _yvd J-^ar Usual. . . 



Lambdas Chew the rag 
Over somebody else's shoulder 
Shove it 
Scotfy and Bob 
Guess where he's been. 



Houlditch guzzles 

Youic — Injuns! 

Acute man shortage. A cute, 

anyway. 
Sci Hall bug. 




[ 35 ] 



Alexander 
Allison 
Anderson 



Jane Baker 
T. A. Baker 
Bentley 



Black 

Bondurant 
Bowles 



Brock 
Brooks 

Joyce Brown 



Winired Brown 

Buchanan 

Burgess 



Burleson 
Carr 
Casey 



Cochran 
Cecil Crow 
Jon Crow 



Crowdi r 
Culdreth 

Culver house 




VL SOPH 



CLARA BELLE ALEXANDER— Economics— Y. W. C. 
A. 1, 2. Pell City, Ala. . . . MARY ANN ALLISON 
— English — Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. . . . 
MARTHA KATE ANDERSON— Beta Sigma Omicron 
—Dietetics — Dietetics Club 1, 2; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 
Glencoe, Ala. 



JANE BAKER— Phi Mu— English. Birmingham, Ala. 
. . . T. A. BAKER— Pi Kappa Phi— Pharmacy. Ocilla, 
Ga. . . . STANLEY BENTLEY— Pi Kappa Alpha— 
History — Entre Nous Staff 2. Butler, Ala. 



WILLIAM H. BLACK— Pi Kappa Phi— Pharmacy. Dub- 
lin, Ga. . . . MASON BONDURANT— Religions Edu- 
cation — Ministerial Association 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2. 
Fairfield, Ala. . . . WARREN BOWLES— Sigma Nu. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



MARLENE BROCK — Phi Mu — Dietetics — Dietetics 
Club I, 2; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 2; Intramural Sports 
Manager for Girls 2; Beauty Parade 1, 2; Candidate 
for H-Day Queen 1; Best All-Round Girl 2. Boaz, 
Ala. . . . MARY BROOKS— Economics— Y . W. C. A. 
1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. . . . JOYCE BROWN— Span- 
ish, English — Y. W. C. A. I, 2; Mission Group 1, 2: 
W. C. V. I, 2. Montgomery, Ala. 



WINFRED BROWN— Pharmacy — Pharmacy Club 1, 2. 
Ariton, Ala. . . . JEAN BUCHANAN— Alpha Delta 
Pi— English. Birmingham, Ala. . . . HERSHEL BUR- 
GESS — Pi Kappa Phi — Pharmacy. Holly Pond, Ala. 



JEANETTE BURLESON— Alpha Delta Pi; Y. W. C. 

A. 1, 2; Y. W. A. I, 2. Gadsden, Ala. . . . JOHN 

CARR — History — Birmingham, Ala. . . . GUY D. 

CASEY — Religious Education — Ministerial Association 
1, 2. Alabama City, Ala. 



PAULINE COCHRAN— Englislj—K S. U. Council 2; 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 2. Centre, Ala. . . . CECIL 
CROW — Religious Education — Ministerial Association 
1, 2. Townley, Ala. . . . JON CROW— Lambda Chi 
Alpha — Religions Education — Alpha Phi Omega; Glee 
Club 1, 2; Class President 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. 



WILLIAM CROWDER — English — Ministerial Associa- 
tion 1, 2. Bessemer, Ala. . . . BILL CULBRETH— 
Religious Education — Ministerial Association 1, 2; Y. 
M. C. A. 1, 2. Columbia, Ala. . . . CECIL CULVER- 
HOUSE — English. Birmingham, Ala. 



^r4oward S^>oph 



T 



homoms 



D M D R E S 



DOUGLAS DAVIDSON — Religious Education— Minis- 
terial Association 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2; A Cappella 
Choir 1, 2. Luverne, Ala. . . . ELIZABETH VAIL 
DAVIS — Alpha Delta Pi, Chaplain 2; Treasurer, Fresh- 
man Class; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 2; Glee Club 2; 
Larger B. S. U. Council 2. Birmingham, Ala. . . . 
ELMER DAVIS — Economics — Double Springs, Ala. 

REGINA ELAINE DENLEY— Phi Mu— Englislj— Y. 

W. C. A. 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala 

FRANCES DORN-£»s/ii/)-W. C. V. 1, 2; Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. . . . 
FRANCES DUKE— English Y. W. C. A. 1, 2; Glee 
Club 1, 2; A Cappella Choir 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. 

VIRGINIA FORD— Economics— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 
Birmingham, Ala. . . . DARLENE FRANKLIN— Phi 
Mu — Vre-Medicine — Y. W. C. A. 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon 
Delta 2; Secretary, Sophomore Class; Pharmacy Club 
1, 2, Secretary 2. Tarrant City, Ala. . . . THOMAS 
FRANKLIN — Chemistry — Laboratory Instructor 2. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

THERESA FRANKS— English— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2; 
Mission Group I, 2. Birmingham, Ala. . . . JOHN 
FRIERSON— Pi Kappa Phi— Pharmacy. Mt. Pleasant, 
Tenn. . . . MARY GILLILAND— Pre-Medicine— Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2; Y. W. A. 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Delta 2; 
B. S. U. Council 2; Vice-President, Freshman Class. 
Gadsden, Ala. 

ANNIE LEE GOLDEN— English— Y . W. A. 1, 2; Y. 
W. C. A. 1, 2, Treasurer 2; W. C. V. 1, 2, Presi- 
dent 2. Shawmut, Ala. . . . KATHERINE GWIN— 
Delta Zeta — English — Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. Bessemer, Ala. 
HUGH H. HADEN— P/jar»zao>— Pharmacy Club 1,2. 
Summit, Ala. 

MARTHA HAGOOD— Phi Mu— Biology — Y. W. A. 1, 
2; Mission Group 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Delta 2; Crim- 
son Staff 1, 2; Entre Nous Staff 1, 2; Dormitory 
Council 2; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 2; B. S. U. Council 2. 
Albertville, Ala. . . . MALLIE HARGROVE— Religions 
Education — Ministerial Association 1, 2. Ardmore, Ten- 
nessee. . . . MACK HARPER — Economics — Glee Club 
1, 2; A Cappella Choir. Jones, Ala. 

WILLIAM A. HASSELL— Pi Kappa Ph.— Pharmacy— 
Pharmacy Club 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. . . . MRS. 
ANNE HATCHER— Spanish. Birmingham, Ala. . . . 
BETTE JANE HOULDITCH — Journalism — Entre 
Nous Staff 2; Crimson Staff 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2; 
A Cappella Choir 1, 2; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2; Publicity 
Staff 2; W. S. O. Recognition Day 1; Honors Day 1. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

E. C. HOUSTON — Religious Education — Ministerial 
Association 1, 2. Bessemer, Ala. . . . NONA KIRK- 
LAND— Phi Mu— Economics— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2; In- 
tramural Sports Council for Girls 2. Enterprise, Ala. 
. . . RALPH LONGSHORE— Ministerial Association 
1, 2; B. S. U. Council 2. Gadsden, Ala. 



Ford 

Darlene Franklin 
Thomas Franklin 




Houston 
Kirkland 
Longshore 



are as well in tonne 




id as J^>oph 



r 



omores anywhere 



f 



hi 



LOVEGRl N 

Lucius 
Mangum 



Mathews 

Glenn Miller 
Martha Mii i i r 



Morris 
Morrison- 
Nelson 



Newman 
Parker 
Patrick 




Patterson 
Bill Patton 
Lionel Patton 



Fred Pearson 
Mary Pearson 
Petrea 



Posey 
Powell 
Pritcharo 



pucciarllli 
Ray 

Reagan 



D ^ 




DL SOPH 



NORMAN LOVEGREN— Chemistry— Glee Club 1, 2; 
A Cappella Choir 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. . . . MARY 
ALICE LUCIUS— Phi Mu— Economics— Y. W. C. A. 
1, 2; Wesley Foundation 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. . . . 
MARY GEORGF. MANGUM— Alpha Delta Pi; Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2; Y. W. A. 1, 2; Crimson Staff 2; Glee 
Club 1, 2. Winfield, Ala. 



JESSE MATHEWS— Sigma Nu; Alpha Phi Omega; 
Football I. Wedowee, Ala. . . . GLENN MILLER— 
Religious Education — Ministerial Association 1, 2. 
Hanceville, Ala. . . . MARTHA MILLER— Alpha Delta 
Pi — Mathematics — Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. Birmingham, 
Ala. 



HUGH MORRIS — Religious Education— Auburn 1; 
Alpha Phi Omega. Shawmut, Ala. . . . FRANK MOR- 
RISON — History — Ministerial Association 1, 2. Louis- 
ville, Ala. . . . TERRELL NELSON— Religious Edu- 
cation — Ministerial Association 1, 2. Albertville, Ala. 



ELWOOD NEWMAN — Mathematics — Masquers 2. 
Birmingham, Ala. . . . LOUISE PARKER— Economu > 
— Y. W. A. 1, 2; Student Senate 1. Lafayette, Ala. 
. . . SUE PATRICK— Delta Zeta; Y. W. A. 1, 2; 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2; Cabinet 2; B. S. U. Council 2; 
Dormitory Council 2. Scottsboro, Ala. 



MARTHA PATTERSON— Phi Mu— Dietetics— Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2, Cabinet 2, President, Freshman Commis- 
sion; Editor, The Bull Pup 1; Masquers, Treasurer 2; 
Glee Club 1, 2; A Cappella Choir 1, 2; B. S. U. Larger 
Council 2; Dietetics Club 1,2; Student Senate 2. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. . . . BILL PATTON— Biology — Alpha 
Phi Omega. Henegar, Ala. . . . LIONEL PATTON— 
Religions Education — Alpha Phi Omega. Henegar, Ala. 



FRED PEARSON— Pi Kappa Phi; Glee Club 1, 2; A 
Cappella Choir 1, 2. Montevallo, Ala. . . . MARY 
PEARSON — Secretary, Freshman Class; B. S. U. Coun- 
cil 2. Montevallo, Ala. . . . EYRA DELL PETREA— 

Business Administration— Y. W. A. 1, 2; Y. W. C. A. 
1, 2; B. S. U. Council 2; A Cappella Choir 1, 2. 
Talladega, Ala. 



MARY ELIZABETH WATSON POSEY— Biology— Al- 
pha Epsilon Delta 2; Glee Club I, 2. Birmingham, Ala. 
. . . M. D. POWELL— Pi Kappa Phi — Economics- 
President 2. Tullahoma, Tenn. . . . HOWARD 
PRIT'CHARD — English, History, Religious Education— 
Ministerial Association I, 2. Alabama City, Ala. 



LUCILLE PUCCIARELLI— Music— Judson I; Y. W. 

C. A. 2; A Cappella Choir 2. Birmingham, Ala. . . . 
WILLIAM J. RAY — Accounting — Birmingham, Ala. 
. . . WILLIE DEAN REAGAN— Religious Education. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



<=Jjeo et tJjoctrinae " at ^Moward L^oite 



eae means 



9 



D M Q R E 5 



JIMMIE RUTLEDGE— Delta Zeti— Education— Uni- 
versity of Alabama 1; Glee Club 2. Oakman, Ala. . . . 
DORIS JEAN RYAN— Business Administration— Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2. Leeds, Ala. . . . CARL SAIA— Lambda 
Chi Alpha — Pharmacy. Birmingham, Ala. 



PAUL SANDERSON— Religious Education— Alpha Phi 
Omega; Ministerial Association 1, 2. Birmingham, 
Ala. . . . JEWEL SCHWEINEBRATEN— Delta Zeta— 
Social Science — Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. 
. . . KATHLEEN SCOTT— Religious Education— Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. 



SARA SCOTT— Social Scienc, — Y. W. A. 1, 2, Vice- 
President 2; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, Cabinet 2; Mission 
Group 1, 2. Pell City, Ala. . . . HORTEZ SEALS— 
History — Ministerial Association 1, 2. Bessemer, Ala. 
GLENNA SHERRER— Dietetics— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2; 
Dietetics Club 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. 



DORIS SHELBY— Religions Education— Y. W. C. A. 
1, 2; Y. W. A. 1, 2; W. C. V. 1, 2; Mission Group 2. 
Fairfield Highlands, Ala. . . . BETTY SIMONTON— 
Delta Zeta — English — Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. Birmingham, 
Ala. . . . HOWARD SISSON— Pi Kappa Alpha; Eco- 
nomics — Football 1; Basketball I, 2; All-Star Intra- 
mural Basketball 1; Assistant Director, Intramura 
Sports 2. Birmingham, Ala. 



SUE SMITH — Beta Sigma Omicron — Mathematics — Y 
W. C. A. 1, 2; Best Dressed 1; Most Intellectual 1 
Pinson, Ala. . . . RACHEL SNEAD— Mathematics— 
Birmingham. Ala. . . . EDWARD VERNON SPEER— 
Pi Kappa Phi — Pharmacy. Wetumpka, Ala. 



RUTH THOMAS— Biology — Y. W. A. 1, 2; Y. W. C 
A. 1, 2; Dormitory Council 2; Larger B. S. U. Coun- 
cil 2. Scottsboro, Ala. . . . RAY THOMASON— 
Lambda Chi Alpha — Engineering. Tarrant City, Ala 
WILLIAM THOMASON— Intramural Sports Counci 
2. Houston, Texas. 



ROBERT THOMPSON— Chemistry— Alpha Ph. Omega; 
Y. W. C. A. Booneville, Miss. . . . ERNEST WEIR— 
Mathematics — Football 1; Assistant Intramural Sports 
Instructor 2. Birmingham, Ala. . . . LAURA MAE 
WHITING— Englis/}— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 



MARY JO WHITTEN— Delta Zeta— Englis/}— Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. . . . VERREL WOF- 
FORD — History — Ministerial Association 1, 2. Boaz, 
Ala. . . . JANE CLAIRE WOOD— French— Y. W. C. 
A. 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2; A Cappella Choir 1, 2. Birming- 
ham, Ala. . . . KATHERINE WRENN— Alpha Delta 
Pi— Englis/)— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2; Bull Pup Staff 1; 
Glee Club 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. 



^y or Ljod and cJLt 






eamm 




rutledge 
Ryan 
Saia 



sanderson 

schweinebraten 
Kathleen Scott 



Sara Scott 
Seals 
Sherrer 



Shelby 
Simonton 
Sisson 



Smith 
Snead 
Speer 



Thomas 
Ray Thomason 
William Thomason 



Thompson 
Weir 

Whiting 



Whitten 
Wofeord 
Wood 
Wrenn 



■■■H^H 



VL FEESHMA 



September, 1942, brought to Howard's campus another 
bunch of freshmen — same as usual — all of us once digni- 
fied seniors, now just plain ole rats! For who could re- 
main dignified after Initiation Day when upperclassmen 
showered upon us every form of freshman abuse imaginable. 
To the relief of us freshmen, that day finally ended, but 
still there were the rat caps and Frosh rules. Those cap; 
dotted the campus for weeks! 

In every respect we were plenty "green." That first 



week we acted like cross-word puzzles, and just as hard 
to figure out. It took us several days to learn the build- 
ings we had classes in. But we became fairly settled toward 
the end of the first six weeks. 

Of course, as was to be expected, we soon felt pangs of 
nostalgia. For some of us week-end visits home became 
regular and continued throughout the year. 

The Freshman reception was as boring as could be. We 
shook hands until our fingers were numb while everyone 



OFFICERS 

President 
Gerald Walker 

Vice President 
Gladstone Pickens 




E S H M A N CU 



PRKSTON BRYANT — P, Kappa Alpha. 
Scottsboro. . . . MARVIN BURKETTI — 
Economics. Birmingham. . . . MAXINF. 
BURNETTE— Pharmacy. Birmingham. . . . 
HILDA BUTLER— Business— Y. W. C. A.; 
Y. W. A. Paint Rock. 



SUE BYNUM— Commercial Course. Attalla. 
. . . HUGH CHAMBLISS— R.//x«»;— Minis- 
terial Association. Boiling. . . . JOHN 
COCHRAN — Sigma Nu — Economics. Bir- 
mingham. . . . MARY COPELAND — Beta 
Sigma Omicron — Y. Vi' . A. Oneonta. 



MARJORIE CORBIN— Voice— Y. W. C. A.; 
Y. \V. A. Albertville. . . . EDGAR CROS- 
BY — English — Ministerial Association; Y. M. 
C. A. Anniston. . . . JOHNNIE CROT- 
WELL — Pharmacy— Y. W. C. A. Bessemer. 
. . . LOIS CROW— Y. W. C. A.; Glee Club. 
Birmingham. 



GAY DANIEL— Religion— Y. W. C. A. An- 
niston. . . . CLIFF DANSBY— Pi Kappa Al- 
pha— Economics— Butler. . . . ETHEL DAW- 
SON. Fyffe. . . . MILES DEAN— Econom- 
ics. Birmingham. 



MAVIS DELAY. Birmingham. . . . JIMMIF 
DOLVIN— Phi Mu — Home Economics— Y . 
W. C. A. Birmingham. . . . NELSON 
DUKE — Ministerial Association. Gadsden. 
. . . WILLIAM IVANS— Pi Kappa Alpha. 
Siluria. 



MARTHA LOU FAG AN— English— Y. \\ . 
C. A.; Y. W. A. Pell City. . . . ALTON 
FORTNER — Economics — A Cappella Choir. 
Wylam. . . . JAYNE FRITSCH— English. 
Birmingham. . . . RALPH GLIDEWELL— 
Pi Kappa Alpha — Economics. Birmingham. 



DOYAL GOOD — Engineering. Pinson. . . . 
JAMES GRIMVC'OOD -- Civil Engineering. 
Lincoln. . . . JAMES GUNTER. Birming- 
ham. . . . KATHERINE HALL— English— 
Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. A. Talladega. 




1^ vl r PI .f ,~ * 



Bryant 
Burkette 
burnette 
Butler 



Bynum 
Chambliss 
Cochran 
Copeland 



of ^sreskman, etc 




MOM 



3. F R E S H M 



Hand 
Hardin 
Hargrove 
Harper 



Harrison 
Harrison 
Hazlegrove 
Henley 



Herring 
Hicks 
Hicks 
Higdon 



Hollis 
Howell 
Hubbert 
Hughes 



Hurtt 
Ingram 
Jackson 
Jeffery 



Johnston 
Jones 
Jordan 
Kean 



Kelley 
Kennedy 
Key 

KlMBRELL 




jft ft) ft ^S 




EDSEL HAND— English. Birmingham. . . . 
LOUISE HARDIN — Delta Zeta — English. 
Birmingham. . . . MRS. MALLIE HAR- 
GROVE— Religion. Ardmore. . . . BRUCE 
HARPER. Jones. 



NORMA HARRISON— Mathematics— Y. W. 
C. A.; Y. W. A. Frisco City. . . . PHYLLIS 
HARRISON — Journalism. Birmingham. . . . 
LEVEN HAZLEGROVE— Chemistry— Intra- 
mural Sports. Birmingham. . . . WALTER 
HENLEY — Sigma Nu — Economics. Jackson. 



JESSE HERRING — Economics. Birmingham. 
. . . FOREST HICKS— Ministerial Associa- 
tion. Montgomery. . . . WILLIAM HICKS 
—English. Thorsby. . . . JOHN HIGDON 
— -History — Ministerial Association. McKenzie. 



JAMES HOLLIS. Tuscumbia. . . . PRES- 
TON HOWELL— Religion. Birmingham. . . . 
BILL HUBBERT— Lambda Chi Alpha— Eco- 
nomics. Birmingham. . . . ROBERT HUGHES 
— Pi Kappa Alpha — Mathematics. Birming- 
ham. 



JOE EARL HURTT— Chemistry. Irondale. 
VIRGINIA INGRAM— Beta Sigma Omicron 
— Economics — Y. W. C. A. Tarrant City. 
. . . HOMER JACKSON— Sigma Nu— 
Chemistry. Birmingham. . . . BERYL JEF- 
FREY— Biology— Y. W. C. A. Birmingham. 



EARL JOHNSTON— Pi Kappa Alpha— Pre- 
Medicine — Air Raid Warden. Mobile. . . . 
ANN JONES— Music— Glee Club; A Cappella 
Choir. New Brockton. ... JO ANN JOR- 
DAN— Glee Club; A Cappella Choir; Y. W. 
C. A. Birmingham. . . . CLAUDIA KEAN. 
Birmingham. 



PAGE KELLEY — English — Ministerial Asso- 
ciation. Hartford. . . . MURRAY KEN- 
NEDY — Economics. Birmingham. . . . JOHN 
KEY — Economics. Birmingham. . . . HENRY 
KlMBRELL— History. Oneonta. 



^Howard L^olleqe and 



^tdk. ^MiLfaifc. 



. 



/\ l\l C/kjj 



BARTLE KIRCHLER— Pre-MeJicwc. Par- 
rish. . . . NORMA LOU KIRK.— Science— 
Y. W. C. A. Winfield. . . . BONNIE 
KNIGHT— Sociology— Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. 
A. Whistler. . . . MRS. LUCIE LADE— 
Dietetics. Birmingham. 



LESTER LANDERS— Boys Glee Club. Al- 
bertville. . . . MILDRED LAWRENCE— 
Economics— Y. W. C. A. Leeds. . . . JAMES 
LILES — English — A Cappella Choir; Glee 
Club. Birmingham. . . . JOHNNIE LIND- 
SAY — Economics. Jasper. 



MEREDITH LITT— Economics— Y. W. C. A. 
Birmingham. . . . CECIL LITTLE — Religion 
- — Ministerial Association. Clanton. . . . 
FRANK LIVELY— Sigma Nu. Gardendale. 
. . . JAMES MARSH — Economics. Pinson. 



LOUISE MASSEY— Delta Zen— Dietetics— A 
Cappella Choir; Glee Club. Birmingham. . . . 
VIRGINIA MAXWELL— Y. W. C. A. Pow- 
derly. . . . CHARLES MITCHELL— Pi Kap- 
pa Alpha — Biology — Boys Glee Club; A Cap- 
pella Choir. Birmingham. . . . LLOYD MOON 
— Religion — Ministerial Association. Gurley. 



WILLIAM MORGAN— Sigma Nu— Econom- 
ics. Birmingham. . . . MARGARET MOR- 
TON — Delta Zeta — Economics — Glee Club; 
Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. A. Newton. . . . 
AILEEN MURPHY. Birmingham. . . . IRA 
MYERS — Pharmacy. Vinemont. 



GEORGE McCLELLAN — Pre-Dental. Bir- 
mingham. . . . MARY ANNE McGEE— 
Alpha Delta Pi — English — Y. W. C. A. 
Helena. . . . THOMAS McHALE— Pi Kappa 
Alpha — Chemistry. Birmingham. . . . JEAN 
McKAY— Phi Mu— Pre-Medicine— Y. W. C. 
A. Birmingham. 



CLAIRECE NELSON— Beta Sigma Omicron 
— Y. W. C. A. Birmingham. . . . MARIE 
NUNNELLEY — Delta Zeta — Dietetics— Y. 
W. C. A. Birmingham. . . . MARJORII 
ORR— Delta Zeta — Music — Y. W. C. A. 
Birmingham. . . . F. B. OUSLEY, JR. Jones. 




KlRCHLER 

Kirk 
Knight 
Lade 



Landers 
Lawrence 
Liles 
Lindsay 



Litt 
Little 
Lively 
Marsh 



Massey 
Maxwell 
Mitchell 



Moon 



Morgan 
Morton 
Murphy 
Myers 



McClellan 
McGee 
McHale 
McKay 



Nelson 

Nunnelley 



Orr 



OUSLEY 



u 



/crsitu were 



first in state to be members ot S^outkern dissociation of Lout 



eaes 



7 



VL F R E S H M 



Parker 
Pass 

Pfrkinson 
Phillips 



Pickens 

PlTTMAN 

Pope 
Potts 



Rainer 
Rector 
Riddick 
Ropi r 



Routh 
Russell 
Sargent 
Sartain 



Simons 
Smith 
Smith 
Stansell 



Stanton 
Stapp 

Stivi ndi r 
Stuart 



Sudouth 

SUTIR 

ThomasoN 
Thompson 




ELAINE PARKER— Phi Mu— Art— Y. W. C. 

A. Birmingham. . . . MARY NELL PASS— 
Dietetics — Y. W. C. A.; Dietetics Club. 
Blourmville. . . . DOROTHY PERKINSON 
— Y. W. C. A. Birmingham. . . . HELEN 
PHILLIPS— Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. A. Cor- 
dova. 

GLADSTONE PICKENS— Biology— Y. M. C. 
A.: Glee Club; Vice-President of Freshman 
Class; Alpha Phi Omega. Alexander City. 
. . . RENAH CLAIRE PlTTMAN— A Cap- 
pella Choir; Glee Club; Y. W. C. A. Bir- 
mingham. . . . MRS. VERA POPE— English. 
Birmingham. . . . EARL POTTS — English— 
Ministerial Association. Shawmut. 

ROSS RAINER— Sigma Nu— Economics— 
Recorder of Sigma Nu. Birmingham. . . . 
GEORGE RECTOR — English — Ministerial 
Association. Birmingham. . . . MARY RUTH 
RIDDICK— Phi Mu— Science— Y. W. C. A. 
Milton. West Va. . . . MARGARET ROPER 
— English — Glee Club; A Cappella Choir. 
Birmingham. 

BETTY ROUTH— Religion— Y. W. C. A. 
Birmingham. ... J. P. RUSSELL — Engineer- 
ing. Birmingham. . . . MARGARET ANN 
SARGENT— Secretary of Y. W. C. A.; Glee 
Club; A Cappella Choir; Larger Council of 

B. S. U. Collinsv : lle. ... I. L. SARTAIN. 
JR. — Pi Kappa Phi — Economics. Jasper. 

NONIE SIMONS— Alpha Delta Pi— English 
— Glee Club- Y. \V\ C. A. Birmingham. . . . 
GENE SMITH— Beta Sigma Omicron— Die- 
tetics— Y. W. C. A. Pinson. . . . QUIN 
SMITH — Lambda Chi Alpha — Journalism — 
Y. M. C. A. B : rmingham. . . . LAVELLE 
STANSELL — Mathematics — Y. \V. C. A. 
Gadsden. 

COLLEEN STANTON— Dietetics— Y. W. C. 

A. Birmingham. . . . CHARLES STAPP— 
Sign. a Nu — Economics — President of Sigma 
Nu Pledges. Birmingham. . . . JAMES STI- 
VENDER — Pi Kappa Alpha — Engineering — 
Crimson Staff; Student Body Council. Bir- 
mingham. . . . JAMES STUART — Religion — 
Ministerial Association; Y. M. C. A. Bir- 
mingham. 

MARTHA SUDDUTH— Phi Mu— English— 
Y. W. C. A. Birmingham. . . . HELEN 
SUTER — English. Birmingham. . . . FAN- 
NIE RUTH THOMASON— Y. W. C. A. 
Tarrant City. . . . BALFOUR THOMPSON 
— Sigma Nu — Pharmacy. Birmingham. 






Jsn 



j-^reiident 



1915 



a n a 



a55 



JAMES THOMPSON— Mathematics. Samson. 
. . . ANNIE RUTH THORNTON— Beta 
Sigma Omicron — Economics — Y. W. C. A. 
Birmingham. . . . MARY ELLEN THORN- 
TON— Phi Mu— Dietetics— Y. W. C. A.; 
Dietetics Club. Attalla. . . . CHARLES 
TINNEY — Pi Kappa Alpha — Economics. Bir- 
mingham. 

M. R. TRAMMEL — Chemistry. Birmingham. 
MADELINE TROBAUGH — Chemistry — Y. 
W. C. A. Ensley. . . . JOYCE TURREN- 
TINE— Alpha Delta Pi. Alexandria, Va. . . . 
JOANNA TYLEE— Alpha Delta Pi. Irondale. 
SARA UPSHAW— Y. W. C. A. Birming- 
ham. . . . HERBERT VINES— Pi Kappa 
Alpha — Economics. Birmingham. . . . AR- 
THUR WADE — Economics. Pinson. . . . 
GERALD WALKER— Pi Kappa Alpha— Pres- 
ident Freshman Class; Boys Glee Club; A 
Cappella Choir; Ushers Club. Birmingham. 
THOMAS GUY WALKER. Birmingham. 
. . . JANYCE WARD— Alpha Delta Pi- 
Howe Economics — A Cappella Choir; Glee 
Club; Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. A. Birmingham. 
. . . GEORGE WARREN— Economics— Orr- 
ville. . . . CURTIS WASSON— Pharmacy 
Birmingham. 

RONALD WEATHERS — Economics — Col- 
lege Orchestra. Birmingham. . . . BONNIE 
RUTH WEAVER— Sociology. Birmingham. 
. . . DAVIS WEAVER— Pre-Medicine— Alpha 
Phi Omega; Entre Nous Staff; Crimson 
Staff; Mission Band; Glee Club; Air Raid 
Warden; Y. M. C. A.; Larger Council of 
B. S. U. Talladega. . . . GERALD WEED— 
Pharmacy. Birmingham. 

TWYNETTE WELLS— Business Administra- 
tion— Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. A. Atmore. . . . 
MARY WESSON— Economics— Y. W. C. A. 
Birmingham. . . . JOHN WESTBROOK— 
Pre-Medicine. Birmingham. . . . MICHAEL 
WHITE — Economics. Irondale. 
OLIVE WHITE— Sociology — Y. W. C. A. 
Birmingham. . . . I'BELLE WHITMAN— 
Pharmacy— Y. W. C. A. Ozark. . . . LAN- 
NETTE WILLIAMS— Glee Club; Y. W. C. 
A. Clanton. . . . BETTY WOODCOCK— 
Delta Zeta — Journalism — Y. W. C. A. Bir- 
mingham. 

IMAGENE VOOTAN-Sorra/osv-A Cap- 
pella Choir; Glee Club; Y. W. C. A.; Wes- 
levan Foundation. Birmingham. . . . BILLIE 
MADGE WORD — Economic. Scottsboro. 
. . . MARY LOUISE WRFNN— Alpha Delta 
Pi— English— Y. W. C. A.; Glee Club. Bir- 
mingham. . . . ALYS YOE — Beta Sigma Omi- 
cron— Biology— Y. W. C. A.; Glee Club. 
Birmingham. . . . FRANCES YOUNG— Del- 
ta Zeta; Y. W. C. A. Ensley. 




Thompson 
Thornton 
Thornton 
Tinney 

Trammel 
Trobaugh 
Turrentine 
Tylee 

L'pshaw 
Vines 
Wade 
Walker 

Walki r 
Ward 
Warren 
Wasson 

Weathers 



Wi in 

Wells 
Wesson 

Westbrook 
White 

W'hiti 

Whitman 
Williams 
Woodcock 

W'OOTAN 

Word 
Wrenn 

Yoe 
Young 



^keibume named Sherman Oak for J4owards first president 



an 



i 

r 




w. 




e Kaude TO H N D R 



From out our number have gone the choicest 
of our youth. Our friends have gone fortli to 
fight our nation's battles on the land, sea and 
in the air. Our nation does not seem to be able 
to keep herself free from the entanglements of 
war and so our friends must go. 

We pause to remember the places they left 
empty — to remember the names called on gradu- 
ation day to which there was response only by 
proxy — to remember the rings left on people's 



third finger left hand, a poor substitute for the 
real thing — to remember the frat pins, the wings, 
the bars, all sorts of cnsignia and what it means — 
to remember the lad who studied for the test but 
did not get to take it — to remember the half done 
jobs that they began. We remember their sacri- 
fice and our sacrifice of them and dedicate our- 
selves to establish peace. 

Wherever you are, our classmates, we salute 
you and pray God's blessings upon you. 



[ 48 ] 



13J 



(Doboic r\ c (i / It a rat 



"There is a clarity of expression and poise that 
points up characteristics that are most pleasing." 




MJ 



Ljeue J^iHi'ln 



y 



"Clarity and wis t fulness of pose and expression, and 
wist fulness does things to any proportion of Beauty." 




+dh ^ 




„ 




"She, too, has /hut wist fulness without which 
the must beautiful are hard ami unattractive, and 
with which the least beautiful are compelling." 



Hi 



iDettij (JDrookt 



''/ 




w - 



"She's got something!' 7 



f fflliM Eileen rf/urphy 



Li 



i55 mar 



4na ^Mnderlon 



"Poise, Figure, Movement, Expression' 




I 







'ore BEAUTY 



These were among the twelve 
chosen in the flesh at the Alabama 
Theatre. 



hss 



lu ran ret [/vara 




I iii oDurlene ^rriiiihtin 



(iii rfimmie /Ujolvin 






H 



oLc 



Hi c?LouiJe /ffaaeij 



*'JJ Jjorothn J-^erhii, 



ison 




PULCHRITUDE!- 



1 



vJ>iliit Siteph 



,j ^rep, 



lemon 



J P* 



11 tor a r rovo 




^Menru {Da I lard 



[ 58 J 



VL Wall Pack 



^Jiuitin Ujeai 



I\a'ph C-dfeidt 



V. J. BaL 




3U p t 



earson 



J, 



[ 59 ] 



^Moward vJ>o< 



WL is WL? 

-suetj must have been beautiful babied — 



1. Miss Howard 

2. Most Popular Girl 
J. Most Popular Boy 

4. Most Intellectual Girl 

5. Most Intellectual Boy 



6. Most Promising Girl 

7. Most Promising Boy 

8. Most Beautiful Girl 

9. Most Handsome Boy 
10. Wittiest Girl 



1 1 . Wittiest Boy 

12. Best All Around Girl 

13. Best All Around Boy 

14. Best Dressed Girl 
1 5. Best Dressed Boy 




TURN TO PAGE 136 



[ 60 ] 



wmm 




GREEKS 










The language of Science Hall is Greek to 
the liberal arts students — but vital to a 
world at war or peace. 







Mathi w s 
Monrof 

murpuri i 

MURPHY 

Ward 



PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL 



MEMBERS 



Selina Baker, AAI1 

Anna Margaret Bee, BIO 
Carolyn Thornton, AZ 
Virginia Lipscomb, AZ 



Jane Mathews, BSO 

Margaret Lee Monroe, <pM 
Lois Murphree, <I>M 
Jane Murphy, AZ 



Margaret Ward, AAII 



The Women's Pan-Hellenic Council is made up of two representatives from 
each sorority with an extra representative from the sorority of which the president 
of the Council is a member. This year Carolyn Thornton, Delta Zeta, was prexy. 
The purpose of the Council is to foster friendliness and co-operation among the sorori- 
ties. Parties, rush rules, and other functions must be planned so as to have no conflict. 

The Council also sponsors a tea every year for the Senior girls at the various 
high schools in the city, trying to interest them in Howard as much as in the sororities. 

The girls haven't been bothered so much as the boys by the Navy program, but 
they hold their breaths as Uncle Sammy's man eyes those neat, white lodges. 



[ 62 ] 



■^H 



Cooper 
Edfeldt 
Edgar 
Ellis 



McEachfrn 
Powell 
Richardson 
Ward 






JJkj^. 




k ~- *0- 





INTER-FRATERNITY CDUNCIL 



Carl Cooper, ITKA 

Ralph Edfeldt, LXA 
Deric Edgar, LXA 
J. T. Ellis, IIK<p 



MEMBERS 

Charles McEachern, ITKA 
M. D. Powell, IIK<p 

John Richardson, SN 
Harvey Ward, 2N 



"Breathes there a man with soul so dead who never to himself has said this is 
my own" and therefore the greatest fraternity on the campus. To prevent ill-feeling 
that may result from this type of nationalistic attitude the Men's Inter-Fraternity 
Council — the League of Fraternities — was formed. It is composed of two representa- 
tives from each fraternity. 

This year the Council dabbled a bit too far in politics and certain candidates 
reneged, so it all ended up in a big free for all. Generally speaking, however, the 
boys kept the routine of making rush rules, keeping parties disentangled, and slitting 
throats. All the Frats got a jolt when the Navy moved the preachers, et cetera, in, which 
event turned out to be a blessing in disguise by almost healing over the animosity 
between frats and non-frats. 



[ 63 ] 



Li 



J 



r - 

Tf 




KAPPA CHAPTER 



ALPHA 



^v. -y 




OFFICERS 

Margaret Ward ..President 

Helen Hinkle ...Vice President 

Carolyn Clemmer ...Treasurer 

Kitty McIntosh .. ... Secretary 



The Alpha Delta Pi Sorority is the oldest on the campus, 
and is noted for its many talented personalities, such as 
Janyce Ward, with her melodious voice; Edna Jo Medlin, 
actress and consistently an "A" student; Joanna Tylee, 
actress and artist; Margaret Ward and Shirley Anderson, 
writers for THE CRIMSON; Mary George Mangum, Doro- 
thy Perkinson, and Nonie Simons, versatile pianists; Bebe 
Suter, commercial artist; Peggy Roper, basketball star; and 
Martha Miller and Selina Baker, excellent volley-ball players. 

Honors came to many of the members this year. Dorothy 
Perkinson, Margaret Ward, and Betty Brooks were among 
the semi-finalists in the Parade of Beauty, with Betty 
and Margaret listed among the six finalists. Betty was 
selected the most beautiful girl on the campus and was 
chosen by the Naviators Squadron stationed here to be 
their sponsor. In the Who's Who Contest, Margaret Ward 
was voted the best-dressed girl on the campus. Dorothy 
Perkinson and Betty Brooks were chosen sweethearts of 
Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity and Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, 
respectively. In the presentation of Ibsen's A DOLL'S 



HOUSE, Edna Jo Medlin had the leading role. Katherine 
Wrenn and Helen Hinkle were tapped by Beta Pi Theta, 
honorary French fraternity; Margaret Ward and Betty 
Davis became members of Chi Delta Phi, honorary English 
fraternity; Mary George Mangum and Jeanette Burleson 
have been initiated into Kappa Pi, honorary art fraternity. 
Helen Hinkle was elected president, and Kitty Mcintosh, 
treasurer of the Junior Division of the American Associa- 
tion of University Women, organized on the campus this 
year. 

In the sale of Forget-me-nots, the A. D. Pi girls sold 
more than any other organization on the campus. 

Socially, the A. D. Pis have kept up with the rest of 
the Greeks. They had many happy times at the lodge, 
in town, and in the homes of various members. All of 
their parties were super, especially the Hallowe'en party at 
Joanna's, and the one at Helen Hinkle's home in Siluria. 

Scholastically, the girls have a record to be proud of. 
They hold the Pan-Hellenic scholarship cup for the campus 
and the scholarship cup for Beta Province of Alpha Delta Pi. 



^Mlpna eJDelta J^i is the oldest sororiti 



on 



ik 



le cam 



pas 



[ 64 ] 



■rrou 



MEMBERS 



Katherine Wrenn 
Jean Buchanan 
Betty Davis 
Shirley Anderson 
Martha Miller 
Joyce Turrentine 



Kathlyn Parson 
Nonie Simons 
Mary Louise Wrenn 
Selina Baker 
Margaret Broadwell 
Mary George Mangum 



Jeanette Burleson 
Edna Jo Medlin 
Sarah Florence 
Eleanor Lowell 
Janyce Ward 
Mary Anne McGrr 



Betty Brooks 
Peggy Roper 
Dorothy Perkinson 
Bebe Suter 
Joanna Tylee 
Carolyn Clemmer 



DELTA PI 




Anderson 
Clemmer 
Miller 

Turrentine 



Baker 
Davis 
McGee 
Tylee 



Broadwell 
Florence 
McIntosh 
Ward 



Brooks 
Hinkle 
Parson 
Ward 



Buchanan 
Mangum 
Roper 
Wrenn 



Burleson 
Medlin 
Simons 
Wrenn 











BETA BETA GHAPTEB 



BETA 



OFFICERS 

Martha Lou Gober _-_ .. Vresdienl 

Bobbie Nichols Jordan Vice-President 

Carolyn Epperson . Treasurer 

Martha Kate Anderson Secretary 



Beta Sigma Omicron with Jane Matthews and later 
Martha Lou Gober at the helm, kept itself well up among 
the other sororities on the campus this year. 

The B. S. O.'s cashed in on one of the best and most 
unusual ideas of the year when they entertained with a 
scrap party to aid the scrap drive. No one was admitted 
to the party without first paying his fee of admittance 
with a piece of vital scrap. The girls of Beta Beta Chapter 
sold Christmas cards in order to help their national chapter 
obtain money to buy station wagons which were donated 
to the Red Cross. That rush party at the home of Gene 
and Sue Smith will be remembered, as well as the several 
record parties at the lodge. 



Among the B. S. O. girls who were in the Beauty Parade 
were Gene Smith, Bobbie Nichols Jordan and Mary Cope- 
land. Gene was listed among the final six beauties. 

Honors generously bestowed upon these girls include 
Bobbie Nichols, member of Kappa Pi art fraternity, Beta 
Pi Theta French fraternity, Hypatia, and Chi Delta Phi 
literary fraternity; Mary Elizabeth Clapper, Chi Delta Ph\ 
Women's Athletic Association, and Pi Kappa Theta jour- 
nalism fraternity; Alys Yoe, a pledge of Alpha Epsilon 
Delta, the pre-med fraternity. 

Cupid looked in the direction of the B. S. O.'s: Claudia 
Kean and Mary Elizabeth Glover wear diamonds on the 
third finger, left hand. 



v-)eta J^iama \Jmicron Sent first sororltu airl from ^Moward to the VwaueS 



[ 66 ] 



Anna Margaret Bee 
Jane Mathews 
Clairece Nelson 
Alys Yoe 



Annie Ruth Thornton 
Mary Copeland 
Gene Smith 
Virginia Ingram 



MEMBERS 

Sue Smith 

Mary Elizabeth Glover 
Mary Elizabeth Clapper 
Dorothy Weathers 



Gwen Hagler 
Emma Jean Mitchell 
Dorothy Turner 
Frances Duke 



SIGMA DMICRDN 










Andi rson 
Duke 

Mathews 
Smith 




Bee 

Glover 
Nelson 
Thornton 


- 


Clapper 
Gober 
Nichols 
Weathers 






Copeland 
Ingram 
Smith 
Yoe 
























ALPHA PI CHAPTER 



DELTA 



OFFICERS 

Carolyn Thornton President 

Jane Murphy ... ...Vice President 

Bettye Prince Treasurer 

Virginia Lipscomb Secretary 



The Delta Zetas had their share of the women prexies 
on the campus with Carolyn Thornton as Delta Zeta 
president and president of the Pan-Hellenic Council; 
Frances McDaniel as president of the Women's Student 
Government; Ruth Allen as the new Chi Delta Phi presi- 
dent, which Frances McDaniel held in the past; Anita 
Meadows as president of the Dietetics Club. 

Jane Murphy, newly-elected president of Delta Zeta, 
Betty Lee Woodcock, and Sue Patrick are important mem- 
bers of the dramatic personnel. Virginia Lipscomb, Sue 
Patrick, Bettye Prince, and Carolyn Thornton led the girls 
in their athletic attempts. 

Delta Zeta had two girls in the semi-finals of the Entre 
Nous Beauty Parade, Efro Gatsis and Louise Massey. Efro 



was also elected Miss Friendliness. Phyllis Harrison was 
selected Sweetheart of Sigma Nu. 

H-Day found the D. Z.'s well represented in the Miss 
H-Day Contest, including Phyllis Harrison, Efro Gatsis, 
Louise Massey, Sue Patrick, Margie Orr, and Jimmie Rut- 
ledge. 

With twenty initiates the annual Rose Banquet and Ball 
was the peak of the spring activities. Other parties in- 
cluded the Founder's Day Banquet and Dance; a scavanger 
hunt honoring the actives; a wiener roast honoring the 
pledges; an informal gathering for the Naval Cadets stationed 
at Renfro Hall; and in the Spring, a twilight picinc at East 
Lake Park. 

Delta Zeta "State Day" brought "sisters" together from 
all over the state. 



^Jjeita /Leta prejidented Ike campus — -Jsi 



out" in a 



[ 68 ] 



■^■a 



i"v7: 



MEMBERS 



Ruth Allen 
Margaret Morton 
Jewel Schweinebraten 
Betty Simonton 
Jayne Fritsch 
Frances McDaniel 
Phyllis Harrison 
Frances Young 



Anita Meadows 
Marjorie Orr 
Efro Gatsis 
Betty Lee Woodcock 
Marjorie Bentley 
Marie Nunnelley 
Mary Jo Whitten 
Louise Massey 



Billie Madge Word 
Louise Hardin 
Jimmie Rutledge 
Gene Bee 
Louise Bohannon 
Sara Howell 
Mary Frances Hays 
Sue Patrick 



Carolyn Thornton 
Jane Murphy 
Bettye Prince 
Virginia Lipscomb 
Cecelia Anderson 
Virginia Claire Bailey 
Esta Bell Elliott 
Katherine Bruner 



Z E T A 




Allen 
Bruner 
Lipscomb 
nunnelly 
Simonton 



Anderson 


B 


AILEY 


Bee 


Bentley 


Bohanan 


Elliott 




Fritsch 


Gatsis 


Hardin 


Hays 


Massey 




Meadows 


Morton 


Murphy 


McDaniel 


Orr 




Patrick 


Prince 


Rutledge 


Schweinfrr aten 


Thornton 




Whitten 


Woodcock 


Young 











I 




ALPHA GAMMA CHAPTER 



P H I 



OFFICERS 

Lois Murphree Lee President 

Helen Cagle Sibley Vice President 

Elizabeth Edwards Treasurer 

Mary Auston Secretary 



For a long time the Alpha Gamma girls will look back 
on 1942-43 as a big year in their history. Among the 
high spots were winning the cup for the Girls' Intramural 
Basketball Tournament with an undefeated record; placing 
two girls in the finals of the Beauty Parade, Jimmie Dolvin 
and Darlene Franklin; and redecorating the sorority lodge. 
The annual pledge Valentine Tea, the girl-break dance, 
moonlight picnics, and scavenger hunts add to the memories 
of the past year. The girls patriotically threw away the 
idea of their annual dance, using the money to aid in the 
war effort instead. However, everyone had terrific fun at 
the house party held in May at Camp Mary Munger. 

Juanita Milam Kaylor and Elaine Parker were the sorority 
artists with Jane Cook Bennett and Elaine Denley as 



models. Masquers members included Martha Patterson, 
Elaine Denley, and Margaret Lee Monroe. Darlene Frank- 
lin and Martha Hagood are members of Alpha Epsilon 
Delta, the pre-med fraternity; Elizabeth Edwards, of Pi 
Kappa Theta journalism fraternity and CRIMSON STAFF; 
Mary Auston, Marlene Brock, Jimmie Dolvin, and Martha 
Patterson, of the Dietetics Club. 

Dan Cupid made h.s appearance, and Jane Baker, Mary 
Auston, and Martha Patterson appeared with Lambda Chi 
pins, and Marlene Brock with in engagement ring from 
Austin Dean. Lois Murphree and Helen Cagle, graduates 
of January, became Mrs. during the spring. Lois was mar- 
ried to Jimmy Lee, and Helen to Ralph Sibley, former 
Howard grid star. 



j-^ni 1 r/u contributed the most books in the campaian tor the soldiers 



[ 70 ] 



MEMBERS 



Beverly Barrow 
Jane Cook Bennett 
Mary Alice Lucius 
Martha Johnson 
Nona Kirkland 
Marlene Brock 
Delouise Granade 
Martha Hagoou 



M U 



Mary Ruth Riddick 
Martha Patterson 
Jane Baker 
Eunice Ward 
Elaine Denley 
Virginia Mehaffey 
Margaret Lee Monroe 
Mary Ellen Thornton 



Jimmie Dolvin 
Jean McKay 
Juanita M. Kaylor 
Nell Allen 
Darlene Franklin 
Barbara Maxon 
Tody Smith 
Jeanette Counts 



Sara King 
Doris Boyles 
Mary Nell Pass 
Elaine Parker 
Mary Louise Hodges 
Lois Murphree Lee 
Helen Cagle Sibley 
Elizabeth Edwards 
Mary Auston 




LLEN 


Auston 


Baki r 


Barrow 


Bl N'Nl TT 




Brock 


Sibley 


Denley 


Dolvin 


Edwards 


Franklin 


Granade 


Hagood 


Johnson 


Kirkland 


Lucius 


Mehaffey 


Monroe 


Lee 


McKay 


Parker 


Pass 


Patterson 


Riddick 


Sudduth 


Thornton 


Ward 


Hodges 

















■■■■■ 






■■■■n 




Theta Alpha Zeta Chapter 



LAMBDA 



OFFICERS 

Ralph Edfeldt. President 

Hugh Quin Vice President 

Jack Chisolm.— Treasurer 

Ray Thomason „ Secretary 



The varied personalities of the members of Lambda Chi 
Alpha added much to the Howard College life for '42-'43. 
The remarkable antics of "Screwball" Dowdy, Quin Smith, 
and Wheeler Flemming were well balanced by the more 
stable personalities of Student Body President Carroll Trot- 
ter, "Little Brother" Edfeldt, and John Robert Cannon, 
the dream man of the Phi Mus. 

The Lambda Chis won the Intramural Football cup 
and made a good showing in the field of basketball and 
softball. 

Ralph Edfeldt, Jon Crow, and Carroll Trotter are all 
actors of the first degree, with Carroll a member of 
Masquers, the dramatic society. Billy Beaird was tapped by 
Trident and is also a member of the Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 
active in sports, and runnerup in the foul shooting contest. 



CRIMSON Business Manager Ralph Edfeldt assured ade- 
quate financial backing for Editor Wendell Givens' paper. 
Tliis, combined with his Glee Club activities and Martha 
Patterson, kept "Little Brother" busy. 

Several of the wearers of the Lambda Chi Crescent have 
been called to the armed forces and are now scattered 
from New York to Florida to Indiana to Texas to Oregon. 

The Lambda Chis were hosts at one of the most suc- 
cessful parties on the campus this past year — the party 
where everyone was arrested for some crime he or she had 
committed and sentenced by a judge for it. Remember? 
Then at another Lambda Chi party the mad game of 
"Rhythm" was introduced. The annual Founders' Day 
banquet and dance was held in March, and the boys in 
service were honored. 



cMambda C-lii ^Alpha is the largest national fraternity on the campus 



[ 72 ] 







MEMBERS 




William Baker 


Ralph Edfeldt 




Charles Dowdy 


Quin Smith 


Roy Bascom 


Deric Edgar 




John Howard 


Ray Thomason 


William Beaird 


Wheeler Flemming 


Tommy Jones 


Carroll Trotter 


Bob Cannon 


Mack Guin 




Herbert McClany 


Guy Walker 


Dick Conerly 


Billy Hubbert 




Howard McLain 


Gordy Germany 


Jon Crow 


Billy Johnson 




Hugh Quin 


Floyd Yarborough 


Austin Dean 


Billy Adams 




Carl Saia 


Clayton Gilbert 
Jack Chisolm 



CHI ALPHA 




Bascom 


Beaird 




Crow 


Edfelt 


Edgar 


Flemming 




Hubbert 


McLain 


Quin 


Saia 


Smith 


Trotter 


Thomason 




ALPHA PI CHAPTER 



P I 



OFFICERS 

Stanley Hand President 

John Tinklepaugh .... ...Vice President 

Julius Mooney.. ...Treasurer 

Stanley Bentley ....Secretary 



The Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity has finished a successful 
year under the leadership of President Hand. When the 
rushing closed, 47 men were wearing the pledge pin of 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 

The Pi K. A.'s were not left behind in politics, for 
they had representatives in the offices of each class, in- 
cluding Stanley Hand, vice president, and Julius Mooney, 
student senator, Senior Class; Charles McEachern, president; 
John Christopher, Carl Cooper, and John Townsend, all 
senators of the Junior Class; Howard Sisson, secretary, 
Sophomore Class; Gerald Walker, president, and James 
Stivender, senator, Freshman Class. 

The Pikes have their share of honors, too, with John 
Christopher on the publications board; John Christopher, 
Carl Cooper, Horace Hagood and Yancey Anthony, all mem- 
bers of Kappa Phi Kappa, the national educational frater- 
nity; Henry Powell, Robert Thompson, Stanley Hand, Alon 



Bee, Porter Landrum, and Robert Cork, Alpha Phi Omega, 
the Service Fraternity; and Robert Thompson, a mem- 
ber of Chi Alpha Sigma, the National Honorary Chemical 
Fraternity. 

Twenty-four Pi K. A.'s have gone to the armed forces. 

Socially, the Pi K. A.'s have more than held their own, 
including their annual dance, the Mother's Club luncheon 
with the faculty as guests, the annual Founder's Day Ban- 
quet, Open House during the house party at Smith Hall, 
and the fraternity annual house party at Double Oak Moun- 
tain. 

In the field of sports, the Pi K. A.'s had one of the 
outstanding football teams, beaten by only one fraternity. 
The Howard All-Star team included Howard Sisson, end, 
and John Christopher and Milton Hodges, guards. The 
Pi K. A.'s came out on top in basketball, winning the 
intramural championship. 



l^l ^y\appa ^Arlpka took tk 



f 



,e cap in 



f 



badketbait 



[ 74 ] 



MEMBERS 



Alon Bee 

Marshall Brittain 
Ernest Brooks 
Wini-red Brown 
Feagin Burns 
John Christopher 
Carl Cooper 
Robert Cork 
Clarence Daniel 
Cliff Dansbv 



Alvin Denham 
Bill Evans 
Ralph Glidevcell 
Jimmy Goodlett 
Horace Hagood 
Milton Hodges 
Bobby Hughes 
Jimmy Lee 
Charles McEachern 
Thomas McHale 



Charles Mitchell 
Julius Mooney 
Bill Pfaff 
Henry Powell 
Howard Sisson 
James Stivender 
Clarence Thomas 
Charles Tinney 
Herbert Vines 
Gerald Weed 



Gerald Walker 
Claude Jones 
T. C. Smith 
Mi ri dith Yoe 
Edsel Hand 
Preston Bryant 
F. B. Ousley 
Jimmy Gunter 
James Grimwood 
Murray Kennedy 



Earl Johnston 
George Warren 
Yancey Anthony 
John Townsend 
Bruce Harper 
Robert Thompson 
Elwood Newman 
John Pitchford 
Homer Russi i i 
C. W. Phillips 



L. W. Kendrick 
Paul Ponder 
Jimmie Davis 
Porter Landrum 
Ed Farrar 
Dave Griffin 
Dr. J. K. Greer 
Faculty Adviser 



EAPPA ALPHA 



O C\ £5 C 








EE 


B 


ENTLEY 


B 


rittain 


B 


R Y A N T 


C 


hristopher 


Cork 


Denham 




Evans 




Glidewell 




Goodlett 




Gunter 


Hagood 


Hand 




Hodges 




Hughes 




Mooney 




Mitchell 


McEachern 


McHale 




Sisson 




Slaughter 




Stivender 




Tinklepaugh 


Tinney 


Walker 




Weed 




Vines 




Pfaff 




Lej 


Kennedy 



!«■■■■ 



■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■I 




ALPHA ETA CHAPTER 



p i 



OFFICERS 

M. D. Powell President 

Jack Snow__. Treasurer 

]. T. Ellis Secretary 



For the benefit of confused freshmen, the Pi Kappa Phi 
house is the gorgeous mansion situated on Woo Hill in 
back of Berry Field. The boys are to be congratulated 
on their fine piece of work in redecorating and refur- 
nishing the house during the fall. 

The Pi Kappa Phis were especially popular among the 
sororities, for the boys entertained each sorority with a 
party at the fraternity house. Dates were determined by 
drawing numbers, and everyone had fun. 

Hershel Burgess surprised everyone by announcing his 
marriage, which had been kept secret for several weeks. 

The boys from the woods have led the other fraternities 
in scholarship for the past seven years, and show no signs 
of giving up the lead now. 



Sam Loftin, John Frierson, and Philip August are mem- 
bers of the Pharmacy Club. Trident has four Pi Kappa 
Phis among its select members: Arthur Dowell, Elvia Ed- 
dleman, Dan Lowery, and Billy Smith. They are all mem- 
bers of Chi Alpha Sigma, the national honorary chemical 
fraternity. Arthur Dowell, Elvia Eddleman, and Carey 
Gwin are members of Alpha Epsilon Delta, the pre-med 
fraternity. Elvia is also a member of the A Cappella Choir. 

One of the most popular men on the campus is Wilford 
Lane, possibly, but not probably because he is the postman. 

"Mother Agnes" Branch has made the fraternity house 
a home for the boys and has made the parties a bigger 
success by her presence. 



l^l ^J\appa l^kl ranks to 



T 



OS IVl 5C 



kotarsk 



'f 



[ 76 ] 







MEMBERS 






Phillip August 


Gene Cook 


William Hassell 


Edward Speer 


Oren Anderson 


T. A. Baker 


Jack Dasher 


Sam Loftin 


Arthur Wade 


Lewis Marler 


Carey Gwin 


Arthur Davis 


James Marsh 


Calvin Woods 


Dan Lowery 


Henry Ballard 


Arthur Dow ell 


Fred Pearson 


Vance Vernon 


Johnny Westbrook 


Billy Black 


Elvia Eddleman 


Miller Trammell 


Robert Wooddy 


Bill Thomason 


Frank Branch 


John Frierson 


J. L. Sartain 


Craton McEachern 


M. D. Powell 


Carl Brakefield 


Alton Fortner 


Billy Smith 


Wilford Lane 


Jack Snow 


Hershel Burgess 


Travis Halbooks 


Jesse Herring 


Donald McRae 


J. T. Ellis 



KAPPA PHI 













It 





r*f 







*4 fa 




UGUST 


Baker 


Ballard 


Black 


Brakefield 


Branch 


Burgess 


Dasher 


Do well 


Eddleman 


Ellis 


Fortner 


Frierson 


Gunn 


Gwin 


Hassell 


Loetin 


Marsh 


Pearson 


Powell 


Sartain 


Smith 


Snow 


Speer 


Trammell 


Wade 


Woods 





!■■■■■■ 




IDTA CHAPTER 



SIGMA 



OFFICERS 

Tom Bryan .....Commander 

Kimball Johnson _ Lieutenant Commander 

Ross Rainer Recorder 

Harvey Ward Treasurer 



Sigma Nu improved in many ways this year — scholas- 
tically, socially, morally, and fraternally. Scholastically, 
Iota Chapter had the best year in several past years. The 
addition of such scholars as Albert Stephens, Charlie Baugh, 
and Jack Nolan sent the average grade of the fraternity 
soaring to record heights. Even Harvey Ward found time 
out from his courting to spend a little time reading the 
Harvard Classics. 

Socially, the Snakes had a rather conservative year. 
Among the events on the Sigma Nu calendar were their 
novel "Shipwreck" party and a fine Christmas party. Who 
could ever forget Howard Kirkland as Santa? The high- 
light of the year was the annual dance held at the Pick- 
wick Club. 

The "love bug" had a very profitable year at the 
Snake House and before the year was over there were very 
few members still wearing their frat pins. They were 
distributed among the females on the campus in large num- 



bers; however, "Woman Hater" Crandall managed to hang 
on to his. 

The Snakes entered the intensified intramural sports pro- 
gram in full force. A pretty good football team was 
fielded, considering that only one or two of the boys had 
ever played before. The basketballers had bad luck to be- 
gin with but ended strong and climaxed the season by 
knocking the Pi Kappa Phis out of the tournament in 
the semi-finals. Phillis Harrison, fraternity sweetheart, 
made a very competent water boy. The only athletic 
championship gained by the Snakes was in the foul-shoot- 
ing, John Richardson winning for the second straight 
year. Ray Todd was the sparkplug of a mediocre soft- 
ball team. 

Most of the brothers this year were members of the 
Naval Reserve. The Snakes held their own in the V-l 
class, with Jesse Mathews and Frank Lively starring. 



S^iama V /a Id the oldest watemitu on tk 



e campvis 



pi 



[ 78 ] 







MEMBERS 






Fred Beverly 


Charles Crandall 


Ross Rainer 


Mack Harper 


Charlie Richey 


Warren Bowles 


Walter Henley 


John Richardson 


Ralph Longshore 


Jimmie Richey 


Tom Bryan 


Homer Jackson 


John Rothermel 


Hugh Morris 


Albert Stephens 


Marvin Burkette 


Kimball Johnson 


Darby Stapp 


Ray Todd 


Charles Baugh 


Oscar Causey 


Frank Lively 


Woodrow Taylor 


Kirby Pickle 


Bobby Stubbs 


Frank Coxwell 


Jesse Mathews 


Balfour Thompson 


Kimsey Lawrence 


Hudson Baggett 


Johnny Cochran 


Jack Morgan 


Harvey Ward 


James Sharman 


Howard Kirkland 




Jack Nolan 


Curt Wasson 


Buddy Weir 





N U 




Beverly 

Cochran 
Lively 

Richardson 



Bowles 
Henley 
Mathews 
Sharman 



Bryan 




Burkette 


Causey 


Jackson 




Johnson 


Lawrence 


Morgan 




Nolan 


Rainer 


Stapp 


Ward 


Wasson 


Weir 



\Jur ^Mu 



ma 




/, 



aier 



Oh, Howard, Alma Mater true, 

I love thy glorious name, deserving every honor due 

To an unsullied fame. 

I'll love thee through each fleeting breath 

For all that thou has done, 

And in the agonies of death 

Be still thy loving son. 






Oh, Alma Mater, dear, thy life 

A treasure is to me: 

Thou, Phoenix fair, through flames and strife, 

Hast shown thy right to be. 

Since poverty has made thee rich 

And struggle made thee strong, 

I view thee in thy self-made niche, 

And burst to filial song. 



Oh, parent true, the future fair 

Must hold but good for thee, 

For hope's fruition waits thee there 

In blest reality. 

And sons like thine will make thee shine 

With glory all thine own, 

And bring to thy maternal shrine 

Not gifts of gold alone. 

Words by Dr. G. W. Macon, '84 
Music by Professor Paul DeLaunav 



[ 80 ] 






URAL 




waram 



« 




~Jhe L^keeneadt 



er5 



James Stivender, Jack Chisolm, Gladstone Pickens 
Sara Chisolm, Dorothy Perkinson, Jo Ann Jordan 



The cheerleaders were chosen when Howard sponsored Auburn in the 
Auburn-Mississippi State charity football game played in Birmingham. 





tm^\ 


mm m — rj^Ktmmn^m 


■ 


W -Pf-i 


Its. M a|* •• fw , , 


J_ 


4* 


1kw5 * E 




\, 


JS^KjR §F 


Ev-\ 


i 






. " 


. «« — 


IT! 


• 



To complete the organiza- 
tion of the Intra-mural pro- 
gram, a council of the vari- 
ous organization representa- 
tives was chosen to keep in 
direct contact with the com- 
petitors in the tournaments. 
The girls' council was com- 
posed of Martha Lou Gober, 
Doris Godwin, Nona Kirk- 
land, Martha Patterson, Mar- 
lene Brock, and Miss Horton. 



^rnt 



ramwra 



/ FOOTBALL 



With the temporary abandonment of varsity football at 
Howard the intra-mural football league in 1942 was big- 
ger and better than ever before. 

Seven teams were entered in the league which boastd 
closer competition and interest among the players than 
many other similar college loops. 

The Lambda Chis retained their title as Intra-mural 
Champions as they wound up the regular league play in 
first place and then went on to the tournament to come 
out Intra-mural Champs of 1942. The Chis went through 
the season with an unblemished record — unbeaten, untied, 
unscored upon — until they were upset by a domineering 
Town Boys team, 7-6. The Chis placed one man on 
the All-Star team, Austin Dean, who filled in the right 
halfback spot on the team. 

The Preachers made a strong bid for the championship 
as they boasted a strong combination, losing only one game 
throughout the season — to the Lambda Chis. They pulled 
into second place with three wins, one defeat and two ties. 
Captain Lewis Marler, playing a stellar game at end for 
the Preachers all season, landed a berth on the All-Star 
team, playing at the end position. 

The Town Boys, after losing their first two starts, 
turned out to be a real threat that might have stopped 
the Lambda Chi powerhouse. The Town Boys had an 
exceptionally fine backfield, placing three of them on the 
All-Star team. The three making the team were Quarter- 
back Captain Clarence "Black Bear" Slaughter, Left Half- 
back John Pittman, and Fullback Charles Henckell. The 
Town Boys came out of regular season play with a tie 
for third place with three wins, two defeats, and one tie. 
They advanced to the finals in the tournament only to be 



beaten, 7-0, by the Lambda Chis. The Town Boys at 
least had the honor of being the only team to subdue 
the Chis. 

The Pi Kappa Alphas, a team with plenty of fight, 
played a hard brand of ball that was good enough to 
bring them a tie for the third place slot in the final 
standings. They placed three men on All-Star team, both 
of the guards, John Christopher and Milton Hodges. How- 
ard Sisson played a great game all season at end and was 
the other Pike to be elected to the All-Stars. During their 
regular season they won three, lost two, and tied one. 

The Sigma Nus fielded a hot-and-cold team that ended 
the season in fourth place with two wins, four defeats, 
and one tie. The Snakes gained victories over the Dormi- 
tory and the Pi Kappa Phis — the teams that ended in 
fifth and sixth places in the standings. They gave the 
Town Boys quite a scare before the Slickers came out 
with a tie. 

The Dormitory had a team that started off bad, losing 
four straight and then coming to life just before the 
season ended to knock off two teams. Pi Kappa Phi and 
Pi Kappa Alpha. They placed one man on the All-Stars, 
John Townsend, who played a good game both defensively 
and offensively for the Dorm. 

The Pi Kappa Phis was a team that gave all the teams 
a hard game but didn't manage to salvage a contest, mainly 
because they had no scoring punch. During the season 
and the tournament the team went without crossing the 
double stripe one time. 

So there you have Howard Intra-Mural Football League 
for 1942. 



THE CHAMPS 



The Lambda Chi Alpha's got the cup. 



Quin Smith, Howard McLain, Herbert McClany, Carroll Trotter, Jack Chisolm, Deric Edgar, Jim 

Thompson, Mack Guin, Billy Hubbert, Austin Dean, V/heeler Flcmming, Dick Conerly, Ralph Edfelt. 

Ray Thomason, Roy Bascom, Carl Saia, Guy Walker, Hugh Quin. 




"ALABAMA'S IXADING COLLEGE WEEKLY' 



Lambda Chis Capture Second Straight Football Crown 



Lambda Chi Tops 
Pi Kappa Alpha In 
Semi-Final Tilt 

Lambda Ctu moved into the final 
round of the tournament last Thurs- 
■Uy afiernoon with a 13 to vtct> 
awer the PPikes before the largest 
crowd of the year. Tom Jones, after 
mi^stng the first game of the tour- 



Dorm Boys Shock Everybody, Mostly Sigma NllS To 



Themselves, By Beating Pi K. A'.s 



ty CKAKt£S 



MAGER 

■ . ■ 
■ 



■■■ won its 
■ . 
Pi K A 



■ ■ 
goal ;<nd : 
In the second half the Pikes 
■ 
things up. In the last play of the 
third period. McEachcrn blocked 
■ ■■ 
to Goodlett 
ne but 
■ 
Jorm .* 
the ? 
Tin* 



Sport Strong 
Grid Outfit 



Hubbard's 10-Yard Pass 
To Dean Gets Lone Score 

Fleming Adds Extra Point And Frat 
Holds Touch Title For Another Year 



The Lambda Chis barged through to their second straight touch 
football championship Tuesday by gaining a bitterly-contested 7 to 
victory from Town Boys in the finals. 

Billy Hubbard passed to Austin Dean ten yards for the score in 
* * second period. Wheeler Flemmmg added the extra point from 

"" ™ ' 1 placement. 

■' -*w|*\aII Tne Lambda ChLs had previously 

I beaten Sigma Nu and Pi Kappa Al- 
pha, both by two ton* -hdowns, to 
- ihe finals. Town Boys had 
«Q the first round and 
■* "It from Boys' 




J Students and Faculty: 
"We Have Your Needs" 
SCHOOL SUPPLIES 
and 

■ Good Candle* — Always Fresh 

O. D. ELLARD 

VARIETY STORE 

Next to 
Boat Like Postoffice Building 



. 
official 
mural Dot 
man to Kp% 
ed the I 
taken from 
outstanding I 
and Slaughter 
of the best kic. I 
the ball high an 



OKlE-DoKlE SANDWICH SHOP 

AT YOUR SERVICE 

SANDWICHES — ROT and COLD DRINKS 
Always Comfortable and Pleasant 

7710 FIRST ACENUE, NORTH 



In tfa« Arc*.v, 
short summer, many bimeiu 
spend two cummers and winters !o 
the caterpillar stage. 



^rnt 



ra - 




ura 



VOLLEY-BALL 



GIRLS 

The girls came through the round robin volley-ball 
tournament with the Smith Hall girls under Captain Nona 
Kirkland winning the 1942 championship. Science Hall, 
led by Nellie Friel, gave quite a bit of trouble and ended 
up second. 

The Beta Sigma Omicron Sorority led by Captain Mary 
Elizabeth Clapper paced the best record for the Greeks. Polly 
Cochran captained the "Y" team to fourth place; Mildred 
Vann, the Town Girls to fifth; Martha Patterson, the 
Phi Mus to sixth; Katherine Gwin, the Delta Zetas to 
seventh; and Margaret Ward, the Alpha Delta Pis to last 
place. The Beta Sigs were the champions of the sorority 
division of the tournament. 

Individual high scoring on serves: Frances McDaniel, 
Delta Zeta, 42 points; Jimmie Dolvin, Phi Mu, 34 points; 
Carolyn Epperson, B. S. O. and Bonnie Knight, "Y", 31 
points apiece; Mildred Vann, Town Girls, 30 points. 

STANDINGS 
Team— W. L. T. 

Smith Hall 6 1 

Science Hall 5 11 

Beta Sigma Omicron 4 3 

Y. W. C. A. _ 4 3 

Town Girls 3 3 1 

Phi Mu 3 4 

Delta Zetas __ 2 5 

Alpha Delta Pi . _ S 2 



BOYS 

The Town Boys walked off with the 1942 Howard 
College Intra-mural Volley-Ball Crown. Their only tough 
opponent was the leading fraternity team, Pi Kappa Alpha, 
whom they defeated in a close two out of three series, 
21-19, 23-25, 21-7. The volley-ball league proved to be 
a huge success and we are looking forward to a bigger 
and better league next year. 

Ail-Star Volley-Ball Team of 1942: Mooney, Pi Kappa 
Alpha; Patton, Stevens' Hash House; Henckell, Town 
Boys; Newman, Town Boys; Rothermel, Faculty; Wooddy, 
Preachers. 

FINAL STANDINGS 

Team— W. L. 

Town Boys 8 

Pi Kappa Alpha : 7 1 

Pi Kappa Phi .-_. 5 3 

Sigma Nu 4 4 

Faculty 4 4 

Stevens' Hash _ 4 4 

Preachers 3 5 

Lambda Chi 1 7 

Y. M. C. A 8 



THE CHAMPS 



SMITH HALL and TOWN BOYS 




CiIRLS — Annette McLeod, Vivian Lang- 
ley, Mary Gilliland, Joyce Brown, Annie 
Lee Golden, Martha Lou Fagan, Ruth 
Thomas; Captain, Nona Kirkland. 



BOYS — Captain, Clarence Slaughter; 
Grady Fullerton, Charles Henckell, James 
Countryman, Elwood Newman, Oscar 
Hurtt, Paul Kluge. 



[ 86 ] 




FOULS 

And 



FUMBLES 



by James Sharman 



% 



s»o s 

a* <J u 






" i'<i 1 1 «► «i « ■ I «l ^> r n I h 



": Males Resting Now, While 

®© I Fems Lose Extra Poundage 
Volley Ball 



RONALD WE um : 



VOLLEYBALL 

surprises that came with, v 

ti a b tils ■! of Pi Kappa Ph 

good m< -i in -■- Spool and F ■ 

- >■■ Pl.t .nut Sier>- 
■ to ■ ! : 1 Cham 



Undefeated Dorm 
I ntinues Lead 

P V-T MARV E. C'l-APFEB 




Is? Volleyball Tburna- 

Into Us fourth weak, 
,• eras undefeated and 
1st. In all five game.* 
ioua Smith Kail team 
margin of ten 
likely that this team 
trophy, though it has 
toughest competition 
Hall and the Tuwn 
lould be the closest 

L nd place are the 

the Town Girls, 

ins and one- loss. 

ot 48-2G 

outplaying the 

very play al- 

-laved a hard 

d« 

w inn i tig 



Roundup 

Volley Ball Meet 
For Girls Goes 
Into 2nd Week 



With interest high the Girls iQ-tJZowlel, the 
Volleyball Tournament I Coach Snide 

. rig int set tmd m ek Games huntin .. ■ ■ 



i tii •■ n ith the Town QirXs i u 
ig a i lose third v iffa 47 p. ■ 

,: ' i '•■l.-.t,,, re. Ward U I 

Uedlin u shaping the A D P 
into better Conn with Um 
capable si rver P« ggj Eto. i ■ 
It Bplte of losing two garni s, * 



Ky: 



>-« with topU un *P la S W *»<* down, befAnnj 

j_twi oting. all the time prayii 
those exe 



i another good I an . id 

cup should the ■ ithi i 

■^TTijih graduation (a I year cut into the 

only th< . still ave Dean and Cannon back 

'with theee tv ball hawks for a nucleus nothing 

pei ted 

PREACHERS 

■ i:t;" up with u good ball club ilthough 

ight be a little weaker than that of List 

Saints lost goud men in Drake and Lewis Saarler and both 

■ ■ ird " won, Wooddj and Malone, however ■■■■ 

I ■ thei campaign to :■ u can count n i tougl bunch 

■ 

IDWN BOVS 
The CI ill be inn team to keep a 9 atchful eye 1 i 

Eth g od malei ial • ' E> 

:<■■;■ m m EQuge Fi [lerton and 
: H r. Johns . Eiazlegtove 

itching; in. will i 

SIGMA M and HASH HOtSERS 
Two teams about whJ 

1 ■ 
. ■, ■■ ad in their divlsi till M ibley^ 

are not as 

turn from ta^t year and chances ire 
team. Ev« 
B 



lie is f 
_ Town Boys 
ream. At the present, ' 
final brackets of the h< 

He Is an 
baseman as will be 
biseball season starts 
Charles is a boy w 
favorite sport — each 



SPORTs W' 
Ii seems that 
not aver as far s 
are concerned 
cron, the only so 
other three soro 
will meet a tea 
stars during Jam 
the combined thi, 
sorority champio' 
a good game 
chance not onl; 
combination' toj 
to see all tbu 
court at one 
The 



C£/ 



tch on the 

jnn, Gilliland, KhUi- 

'■tte.-on. and Bonnie 
Markee and Owlnn 
techniques all their 
hard to beat - . . 
iu shown the most 

* any one person 

M Girls get in 





Pikes, Pi Kappa Phi, Faculty 
Are Winners In VolleyBal! 



Ml N 8 VOLLEYBALL 

^undines 



phen i II ■ 


. II 


ISO .' 


■ 




I 


nbda Chi 




1 


U C A 




1 



came in for their 
i as >' st Oualey and Preston 
r/hesc two, along with Mooney, 
great tribute to the Pike team 
men on the all-Star team 



..; Men's Volleyball 
Play Attracts 
Nine Teams 



f\\ 



men's volleyball league gt't 
.-. iy Wednesday 

Preachers opposing 



Pet 

i oon 
, Q 
667 
667 



Town Boys Top 
Hash House Gang 

Led by Henckeli, H ..<!.■,.■ 
Kleugi the Fown Slickers anni- 
; .t. .i Stevens u tab Eft-rase In i 
I same Tuesday aftern ton, 
The n ■ hers mad I i battle all 
through the Brat game as Pattern, 
Lightsej and Martin m itched th< 
[oi point In the 
second game I was i 



By Ron \i.i) vi i vim ECS 
■ -i kfi Eachi 

in Tinkle 
i 'i ho P look the Pre* 

■r -. 
■■ ■■ .i . . M 

S. McE - ., 

e ball and did nouish 

I 
bu< kled down u ■ ight b .;. 

1 
dui on top p >w< ■' y- n 

bert pla.ved good ball for the 
l '] | BcJtM i . 

The PI Kappa PWs wi B theu 
second Nm_.ii.' game, downing the 
Lambda Chis 8.21, 21-7, and 21-18, 
in the (ir^i genu it Looked ^ if the 
Oil ■ bad already put the set on ice, 

taj [] ., 'i with SUCh .i wide margin 
Hut the Phis came back 
in the second game io duplicate the 
rfoi n nce of the Lambda Chi? 
taking them 21-7 The Lambda Chis 
"..-i h ird to take the thi ■ 



i >, ho 



ot 



Ihi 



Pin 



Ha,se!, 



VARSITY BASKE 



The 1943 edition of the Howard Varsity Basketball 
Team can adequately be described in the one word that 
Bob Phillips of The Birmingham Age-Herald 1 used: "Frus- 
trated." The best potential team the school had seen in 
five years, a first t.ve who had seen action together for 
two previous years at Howard; a team strong in reserves; 
a team with a new coach, "Snitz" Snider, was held back 
from becoming one of the top 1943 teams by the lack of 
a definite schedule. 

During the course of the season, the Bulldogs rocked 
to ten wins and five defeats, not a very impressive-looking 
record, but better than it appears on the surface. The 
Baptists coasted along and won eight straight games before 
they received their first set-back at the hands of Loyola. 
The team never reached its peak because it had no com- 
petitors to push it. The Bulldogs would not have ex- 
perienced their first defeat had they met some strong 
competition at the first of the season. 

Everyone of the first stringers scored 100 or more 
points during the season: Wheeler Fleming, 172 points; 
Abe Epsman, 161; Horace Peterson, 115; Alvin Denham, 
104; Deric Edgar, 100 points, before he left the game 
via the foul route. 






Three members of t 
games: Wheeler Flemmi 

And sc there's the 
Results of games: 

Howard 53 

Howard 46 

Howard _ 54 

Howard 42 

Howard 66 

Howard 60 

Howard 60 

Howard 48 

Howard 40 

Howard 61 

Howard 73 

Howard 43 

Howard 36 

Howard — 5 3 

Howard 70 



he first team turned in 20-point 
ng, Abe Epsman, Horace Peterson, 
team — "Frustrated." 

Key Field . 31 

Jackson State Teachers 28 

Celtics _ 45 

Jackson State Teachers 18 

Camp Sibert 3 3 

Key Field _ .... . 40 

Sylacauga All-Stars 37 

Camp Sibert 46 

Loyola _ 62 

Loyola - 72 

Loyola 47 

Murray State Teachers .._ 48 

Murray State Teachers 38 

Camp Sibert 54 

Camp Sibert 37 



Total 805 Total 

Avg. Per Game, 53.67 



.636 

Avg. Per Game 42.4 



*i| 









~iW 



TBALL-/ HOWARD 




Abe Epsman, Horace Peterson, Wheeler Flemming, Al Denham, Deric Edgar. 



UL MANAGER 



Since Ernest "Buddy" Weir came to Howard in 1941 
he has made quite a record as an athletic enthusiast. 
During his freshman year, he played center on the 
Bullpup team. He left Howard for half a semester to 
go to the University of Chattanooga to play football 
but was soon back on the Howard campus because of 
a broken hand which prevented his further football 
playing. 

With the abandonment of varsity football at Howard, 
Weir fell in line with the newly instituted intra-mural 
program and became one of the capable intra-mural in- 
structors whose duty it was to organize different sea- 
sonal sports and referee at games. He showed great 
ability as an arbitrator at the intra-mural football 
games. 

\\ hen the basketball season opened and Howard 
started practice for its only intercollegiate sport. Buddy 
ottered his services as manager of the team. 

Weir got along well with every member of the 
team. He affectionately speaks of this year's team as 
his "Dream Team." 





Dean 
Key 



Denham 
Marler 



Edgar 

Peterson 



Z)L P L A 



MILES DEAN ("Miles")— Freshman— Proved 
invaluable as relief center. Very aggressive. 
Lettered as freshman. ALVIN DENHAM 
("Alex City") — Junior — Best defensive player 
on the team. Long shot artist. Second straight 
year as regular guard. Scored over a hundred 
points during the season. DERIC EDGAR 
("Ram") — Junior — Regular center. Good de- 
fensive man. Uncanny in shooting when hot. 
Has two letters in basketball. 



JOHN KEY ("Leed")— Freshman— First time 
out and played varsity ball. Cool and col- 
lected. Saw lots of relief service. LEWIS MAR- 
LER ("Preacher") — Only sophomore on the 
team — one of the best defensive players on the 
squad. Aggressive. HORACE PETERSON 
("Snake") — Junior — Co-Captain. Regular for- 
ward. Consistent and clear-headed on the floor. 
Very good defensive man. Scored over a hun- 
dred points. Second year as letter man. 



[ 90 1 




Epsman 

PlTTMAN 



Flemming 

Slaughter 



Guin 



Wesson 



Y E R S 



ABE EPSMAN ("Logi")— Junior— Aggres- 
siveness is the word for Abe Epsman. He is fast 
and furious when it comes to covering territory. 
The leading scorer. Second letter in basketball. 
WHEELER FLEMMING ("Big Flem")— Junior 
— Captain Flem is a versatile player and always 
reliable. Has a crack one-hand shot and never 
loses his head in the excitement of the game. 
MACK GUIN ("Flash")— Junior— Mack is a 
very fast player, and shows amazing accuracy 
in his long shots. 



JOHN PlTTMAN ("Shot")— Junior— Crack 
long shot, and very aggressive on defense. CLAR- 
ENCE SLAUGHTER ("Black Bear")— Junior- 
Alternated as forward and guard. Consistent 
and always reliable. Ranked sixth in total points 
scored. Good defensive player. He earned his 
second letter in basketball. DOC WESSON 
("Doc") — Junior — Very aggressive and tricky 
ball player. Again the Fans' favorite. HOW- 
ARD SISSON ("Sleepy")— Junior— Saw lots of 
reserve service. Very aggressive. 



[ 91 ] 



■I 



^Jke 



H CLUB 



OFFICERS 

Resident... James Sh arman 

Vice-President- j OHN Christopher 

/ reasurer. .Clarence Slaughter 

Secretary.... Carl C ooper 

Custodian Wheeler Flemming 



MEMBERS 



Carl Cooper 

John Christopher 
John Richardson 
Austin Dean 
James Sharman 
Wendell Givens 

Wheeler Flemming 
Horace Peterson 
John Townsend 



Milton Hodges 
Clarence Slaughter 
Abe Epsman 
Buddy Wier 

Ronald Weathers 
Miles Dean 
John Key 

Lewis Marler 

Dr. Davison 

Dr. Dale 



This picture was taken in 
the "H" Club room and it 
represents the members of 
the 19J5 football team. This 
fighting team tied the 
mighty Alabama "Crimson 
Tide," 7-7, and to honor 
them, their pictures have 
jeen arranged to form a per- 
manent "H" in the Club 
Room. 

James Sharman and John 
Townsend are showing them 
off. 




[ 92 ] 



w^mm^^mm 



Stand* for HOWARD 



The "H" Club is composed of all the male 
athletes on the campus who earn a letter in a 
major sport and merit the approval of the gen- 
eral body. At the present time the only major 
sport is basketball since football, baseball, and 
track have been dropped for the duration. 

Until football was dropped, the "H" Club 
sponsored the Annual H-Day celebration which 
featured an intra-squad football attraction. Now 
the club plays a definite part in planning and 
supervising the intra-mural sports and the student 
body looks up to its leadership. 

Socially the "H" Club enjoyed its best year 
as numerous parties were given in the H-Club 
room in honor of members going into the service. 
Members who left for the armed service this 
year include John Towsend, Milton Hodges, 
Woodrow Taylor, Austin Dean, and Abe Epsman. 
The remaining members are expected to be called 
to the colors by July as most of them are in 
the reserves. 



Edgar 

Christopher 
Flemming 
Lawrence 
Sharman 
Cnoper 
Epsman 
Hodges 

Richardson 
Townsend 



ma 




VL W. A. A. at HOWARD 



Since its founding in 1930 the Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation has proved itself to be one of the most active or- 
ganizations on the campus. The aim of the association 
is fourfold: to promote the health and recreation of the 
women, to encourage leadership and service of women, to 
cooperate with other campus organizations, and to further 
the highest type of college spirit. 



In order to secure members to keep these ideals a pros- 
pective member must meet the requirements set up by the 
organization. She must have a minimum of one hundred 
points in a single sport for membership. A minimum of 
one hundred points must be received every semester to re- 
tain membership. 



V.J 




OFFICERS 

President Kaye Markee 

Vice-President Myrtice Thomason 

Secretary Nellie Friel 

Treasurer „. Flonnie Cooper 



MEMBERS 



Mildred Vann 
Betty McCool 
Sara McNeill 
Doris Godwin- 
Annette McLeod 
Ruth Thomas 
Mary K. Finley 
Mary E. Clapper 

Nell Brown 

Jo Ann Jordan 
Lois Crowe 

Beryl Jeffery 



Virginia Maxwell 
Marlene Brock 
Rosa Finocchio 
Mary Gilliland 

Margene Graham 
Nona Kirkland 
Bobbie Nichols 
Ruth Thomas 

Twynette Wells 
Olive White 
Mavis DeLay 
Nell Allen 



Virginia Maxwell, Jo Ann Jordan, Mary Gilliland, Nona Kirkland, Marlene Brock, Berryl Jeffery, 

Olive White, Sara Upshaw, Lois Crowe, Elizabeth Watson Posey. 

Margene Graham, Annette McLeod, Nellie Friel, Kaye Markee, Doris Godwin, Bonnie Knight, 

Betty McCool. 



■■■ 



I ■< 




ACTIVITIES 




The vine-covered shark is noted for its 
post office. This year many letters re- 
ceived were marked ''Free'" in the upper 
left hand corner. 



ooa 




eDresenUn 



ip 



tu 



f 



the 



One of Howard's high distinctions is to be 
elected senate representative. The senate leads 
and coordinates student activities, and determ- 
ines how student activity fees should be spent. 
Student publications are provided for from this 
fund. The senate also elects the student mem- 
bers of the Publications Board. 

The student senate prides itself that it has 
led the student body through a successful fi- 
nancial year and come out in the black, with 
some to spare. The students can make no com- 
plaint of stinginess, for trophies for prize win- 
ning intra-mural teams were bought, a lavish 
H-day was presented, and a cyclorama for the 



stage is promised. Franklin Parker, student 
auditor, kept a close check on the finances, so 
none slipped away unaccounted for. 

Besides rightly appropriating funds, this year's 
senate led the school in the support of Auburn's 
team at the crippled children's benefit game, be- 
cause this is Howard's first year without a regu- 
lar team. 

A precedent was set this year in granting a 
half scholarship to the president of the student 
body. Although the act is not yet ratified by 
the student body for the constitution, a recom- 
mendation for future senates to continue the 
scholarship is in the minutes. 




Robert Wooddy, John Pittman, Carey Gwin, John Christopher, Carl Cooper, James Stivender. 

Julius Mooney, Helen Cagle Sibley, Grady Fullerton, Mary Pearson, Carroll Trotter, 

Doris Godwin, John Townsend, Martha Patterson. 



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STUDENT BODY 



STUDENT BODY 
DFFIEEBS 

Unusual for days of 1-A and khaki 
is Howard's student body leadership. 
After weeks of intensive campaign- 
ing, an all male student officer quar- 
tet emerged triumphant. The race 
was unusually active, five having run 
for president. The officers are a 
good representation of student body 
interests. There are preachers, an 
economist, intra-mural stars, and an 
actor. With such a balance, the funds 
were well allotted for the promotion 
of all student activities. 




Robert Wooddy, secretary; John Pittman, vice-president; Carroll Trorter, president; 
Grady Fullcrton, treasurer. 



Bettye Prince, Frances McDaniel, Mary Virginia Alien. 



WOMEN'S STUDENT 
GOVEBNMENT 

Sponsored by Dean Obenchain, 
this organization functions as part 
of the student government to unite 
the women's organizations on the 
campus. With Frances McDaniel as 
president, Mary Virginia Allen as 
vice-president, and Bettye Prince as 
secretary, the co-eds have been active 
in sponsoring chapel programs at 
which leading women of the city have 
spoken. This year a drive to purchase 
a silver service, to be used by the 
campus at large was started. The 
crowning feature of an active year 
was the day on which service ribbons 
were presented to three girls from 
each co-ed organization for outstand- 
ing service rendered. 




[ 97 ] 





119 4 3 



In spite of all the hardships and reversals of 
fortune this year, in spite of your lack of faith 
and our lack of films here we are portrayed 
in our creation. Now you know to whom to 
make your kicks for every section carries its 
error. We are proud to present this book to 
you. We hope you find it to be what it is in- 
tended to be — a record of your life on the cam- 
pus for one year. 

Maybe we haven't touched all the things that 
touched you, but we have done our best and 
here is the result. At least, perhaps, we have 
caught the most important things. 

We hope that you will find this to be a synop- 
sis of Howard. There are the organizations about 
which we have endeavored to print the truth 
from the view of us who have considered each 
one. That all organizations do not fulfill the 
noble purpose for which they were established 
and do become mere meetings is a good thing to 
learn early. Be selective. That true honor con- 
sists of steadfast effort is another. That taking 
part in school activities had better consist of 
doing few things well than doing everything 
poorly is another. 

Perhaps, this book will help you to be more 
selective. If not, at least it will record perma- 
nently what has happened to you and Howard 
College in 1943. 



Business Manager, Margis Robinson 



[ 98 1 



M^M 



ENTRE NOUS 



THE STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief — -Betsy Barnes 
Business Manager — Margis Robinson 
Assistant Editor — Hugh Quin 

Sports Editors — Clarence Slaughter, Al Den- 
ham, Mary Elizabeth Clapper, Ronald 
Weathers 

Organizations Editor — Bette Jane Houlditch, 
Sara Williams, Mary Pearson 

Feature Writers — Martha Hagood, Wendell 
Givens, Mary Gilliland, Carolyn Gar- 
rick 

Greeks Editor — Elizabeth Edwards 



Snap Shots — Arthur Dowell, Bill Thomason, 
Y. L. Anthony, Doc Wesson, Cathryne 
Word, Jimmie Beasley, Polly Cochran 

Photographer — Oren Anderson 

Art Editor — Bobbie Nichols Jordan 

Senior Class Editor — Betty Prince 

Junior Class Editor — Margaret Lee Monroe 

Sophomore Class Editor — Mary Pearson 

Freshman Class Editor — Davis Weaver 

Typists — Polly Cochran, Htldred Ellis 

Features — Mary Kate Finley, Charles Niagf.r 



Oren Anderson, Hugh Quin, Doc Wesson, Al Denham, Y. L. Anthony, Clarence Slaughter, 
Polly Cochran, Bette Houlditch, Cathryne Word, Bobbie Jordan, Mary K. Finley, Elizabeth 
Edwards, Sara Williams, Margaret Lee Monroe, Davis Weaver, Mary Pearson, Carolyn Garrick. 





Editors, Frances McDonald and Wendell Givens 




Business Managers, Gerald Tidwell and Ralph Edfeldt 



VL H D W 



The Crimson of World War II has under- 
gone many changes due to drafts, marriages, 
and various circumstances. In spite of these 
changes, or rather because of them, variety and 
spice have been added to it. Wendell Givens 
was the editor for the first half of its twenty- 
eighth year of publication. When Uncle Sam 
beckoned to Wendell, Frances Galbreath was 
appointed to succeed him. Then Joe McDonald 
beckoned to Frances and she became Mrs. Mc- 
Donald. Ralph Edfeldt and Gerald Tidwell 
have proved very apt and efficient in handling 
the business affairs of the paper. 



The Crimson has indeed been representative 
and impartial this year. It has attempted to 
serve as an information bureau to alumni, stu- 
dents, and faculty. The staff of the Crimson 
has worked hard and have portrayed, through 
their writings, their journalistic ability. Wen- 
dell's change in the type and length of the 
paper was met with many words of approval and 
commendation. The paper has lived up to its new 
slogan originated by Wendell, "Alabama's Leading 
College Weekly." 



[ 100 ] 



■■ 



ARD CRIMSON 



THE STAFF 



Editors-in-Chief — Wendell Givens, Frances 
Galbreath McDonald 

Business Managers — Ralph Edfelt, Gerald 

TlDWELL 

Assistant Editors — Mary Pearson, Sara Mc- 
Neill 

Circulation — Myrtice Thomason, Kaye Mar- 

KEE 

Editorial — Mabry Lunceford, Herman Cobb, 
Doc Wesson, Frank Branch 



Features — Carolyn Garrick, Sara Williams, 
Margaret Ward, Dudley Watkins, Vance 
Vernon, Howard Boozer 

Sports — Ronald Weathers, James Sharman, 
Al Denham, Hugh Quin, James Stivender, 
Gene Grogan, Mary Elizabeth Clapper 

Society — Elizabeth Edwards, Shirley Ander- 
son, Jane Murphy, Bettye Prince 

Neu-'s — Frances McDaniel, Martha Hagood, 
Davis Weaver, Miriam McCullough, Bette 
Jane Houlditch 




Elvia Eddleman, Gerald Tidwell, Carl Whirley, Hugh Quin, Elizabeth Edwards, Doc Wesson, 

Myrtice Thomason, Al Denham, Davis Weaver, Kaye Markee, Y. L. Anthony, 

Miriam McCullough, Buddy Weir, Howard Boozer. 

Sara Williams, Mary Pearson, Frances McDaniel, Bette Houlditch, Carolyn Garrick. 



f*r^ 



>'■>&!*■ 



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& a J ./PUBLICATIONS 



Membership of the Student Publications 
Beard consists of the dean of the college, the 
head of the Economics department, and three 
students selected by the Student Senate. 

The main functions of the board are to se- 
lect the business managers of the Entre Nous, 
Crimson, and Bull Pup; to sign contracts of 



these publications; and to check on the funds 
used by them. 

The board was brought into being by the stu- 
dent constitution in 1939. Some of us are be- 
ginning to wonder whether it has become a 
sort of fifth wheel or not. 



MEMBERS 

Dean Burns 

Dr. Moore 

John Christopher 

Frances Galbreath 
McDonald 

Hugh Quin 




[ 102 ] 




ORGANIZATIONS 





Keiifroe was taken over by one of the 
largest organizations in the United States. 
We acquiesce to our Uncle. 



ail 



Allen 

Anderton 
Godwin 

Hodges 
Langley 
Jordan 






H YP AT I A 



President 



OFFICERS 



Doris Godwin 



Mary Virginia Allen 
Doris Godwin 



MEMBERS 

Bobbie Nichols Jordan 
Mary Louise Hodges 



Vivian Langley 
Martha Anderton 



Character, scholarship, leadership, and promise 
of future usefulness are the four points upon 
which membership in Hypatia is based. Recog- 
nized as the highest honor that a girl at Howard 
can attain, Hypatia was founded secretly at How- 
ard in 1924. Since that time a succession of 
the intellectual elite has graced its roster. 

Under the leadership of President Doris God- 
win the organization did good work this year, 
although it did not sponsor a career conference 



as had been done for several years in the past. 

Seven girls were tapped at the annual out-door 
ceremony held this year on May 5. And it 
didn't rain. It never rains on Hypatia Tap Day. 
Even the elements co-operate. As has grown to 
be the tradition on Tap Day, Dean Burns offi- 
ciated, introducing and interpreting Hypatia to 
the students. This year he mentioned "Hypatia" 
only )3 times as against his usual 60 odd. 



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[ 104 ] 




Atchison 
Dowell 

Lunceford 
Parker 
Smith 
Trotter 
Whirlev 



TRIDENT 



President 



OFFICERS 

Franklin Parker 



Ray Atchison 
Arthur M. Dowell 



MEMBERS 

Mabry Lunceford 
Franklin Parker 
Billy Smith 



Carroll Trotter 
Carl Whirley 



Trident taps. . . . Each year one of the most 
thrilling of all occasions is Trident tapping. 
While two members of the men's honor group 
walk through the crowded auditorium and lo- 
cate the unsuspecting candidate, the president 
announces from the stage the name of the person 
being tapped. 

The three points in the Trident which form 
the standard of membership in the organization 
are scholarship, leadership, and esteem of students 



and faculty. All of the three qualifications are 
of equal importance in determining membership, 
Trident says. 

President Franklin Parker was toastmaster this 
year at the annual banquet. As the principal 
speaker, Dean Burns brought an inspiring address, 
"Subject to Inspection." 

Nine men were tapped this year and will carry 
on the traditions reverenced by Trident men since 
its founding at Howard May 17, 1931. 



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Allen 

Anderton 
Atchison 
Barnes 

Godwin 
Gwin 

Lunceford 
Jordan 
Parker 

Sharman 
Smith 
Trotter 
Whirley 




WHO'S WHO AMONG STUDENTS 



^rn ^svmerican Ulniversities and Lo 



eaei 



c ) 



Mary Virginia Allen 
Martha Anderton 
Ray Atchison 
Betsy Barnes 



MEMBERS 

Doris Godwin 

Carey Gwin 

Mabry Lunceford 

Bobbie Nichols 

Robert Franklin Parker 



James Sharman 
Billy Smith 
Carroll Trotter 
Carl Whirley 



Who's Who is one of those would-be honors 
on the campus — would be an honor if it were 
not such a racket. Thirteen Seniors are selected 
each year by a faculty committee to be repre- 
sented with a short college biography in a pub- 
lication whose purpose is to recognize the out- 
standing students in colleges and universities all 



over the nation. Of course, the student is urged 
to purchase a copy of said publication as well 
as a key. They recommend those students to 
various businesses. 

Seniors are chosen not only for scholarship but 
for leadership and character. 



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Cv £5 ft. 



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4\^4 



Albright 
Bee 
Brown 
Bryan 
Cobb 
Crow 
Davis 
Dodd 

Dowel 1 

Edfeldt 
Edgar 

Fullerton 
Gwin 
Hurtt 
Johnson 
Mathews 

Morris 

H. Patton 
L. Patton 
Pickens 
Pittman 
Pope 

Sanderson 
Slaughter 

Stephenson 
Tidwell 
Thompson 
Trotter 
Weaver 
Wesson 
Wooddy 



ALPHA PHI DM EGA 



Se 



eruice 



Marion Albright 
Alon Bee 
Robert Brown 
Tom Bryan 
Herman Cobb 
Jon Crow 
Willie Jack Davis 
John Dodd 
Arthur Dowell 
Ralph Edfeldt 
Deric Edgar 



MEMBERS 

Grady Fullerton 
Carey Gwin 
Oscar Lee Hurtt 
Ralph Johnson 
Jesse Mathews 
Hugh Morris 
Harold Patton 
Lionel Patton 
Gladstone Pickens 
John Pittman 
Milton Pope 



Henry Powell 
Paul Sanderson 
Clarence Slaughter 
Billy Stephenson 
Gerald Tidwell 
Robert Thompson 
Carroll Trotter 
Davis Weaver 
Doc Wesson 
Robert Wooddy 



Grown-up Boy Scouts are given the chance 
to continue their good deeds while in college 
by the service fraternity, Alpha Phi Omega. Or- 
ganized in 1940, its usefulness increases with its 
age. Last year the pride of the organization was 
the post office. Not quite so glorious, but none- 



theless useful, are the pencil sharpeners and waste 
cans installed this year. Since each member had 
to sponsor a service project, the campus over- 
flowed with worthwhile activity. One of the 
club's most delightful services was rendered to 
itself when the annual banquet was held. 



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Quin 
Tidwell 
Rothermel 

Atchison 
Clapper 
Barnes 
Houlditch 
McDonald 
Edwards 




PI KAPPA THETA 

sfoumauim 
MEMBERS 



Betsy Barnes 
Ray Atchison 
Elizabeth Edwards 



Bette Jane Houlditch Gerald Tidwell 

Hugh Quin Howard Boozer 

Mary Eizlabeth Clapper Mr. Rothermel 

Frances Galbreath McDonald 



An informal organization of outstanding 
members of the Fourth Estate in journalism is 
Pi Kappa Theta, honorary journalism fraternity. 
To be eligible for membership a student must 
excel in classroom journalism or do outstanding 
work on student publications — preferably both. 
The organization insists on its members' having a 
high code of moral ethics. 



The group did several interesting things this 
year. Among them were a trip to Moundville 
and a party for Ray Atchison and Hugh Quin, 
who left to go into the armed forces. A bit of 
cosmopolitan atmosphere was incorporated when 
Brother Derso, a German refugee and professor 
at University, was made an honorary member. 
A hike to the beacon finished off an active and 
pleasant year for the fraternity. 



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Godwin 
Trotter 
Wrenn 
Hinklc 

Cooper 
Ward 
Acton 
Jordan 
Wood 



BETA PI THETA 



^jrrenck 







OFFICERS 






President Bobbie 


Nichols 


Jordan Secretary 




Flonnie Cooper 


Vice-President 


Doris 


Godwin Treasurer. . 

MEMBERS 




Margaret Ward 


Flonnie Cooper 




Bobbie Nichols Jordan 


Jane Claire Wood 


Doris Godwin 




Dr. Acton 


Katherine Wrenn 


Helen Hinkle 




Carroll Trotter 
Margaret Ward 


Dr. 


Owens 



The organization for the brainy parleurs de 
francais is Beta Pi Theta. Those upperclassmen, 
who have displayed ability in the use of the po- 
lite language and have proved themselves not too 
unscholastic otherwise, are eligible for member- 



ship. Beginning with a lively, mystical initia- 
tion, the activities of Pi Kappa Theta are car- 
ried on throughout the year. Though little ad- 
vertised on the campus, Pi Kappa Theta is a 
distinct honor for those who attain it. 



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[ 109 ] 



Jordan 

Woodcock 

McNeill 

Ward 

Markee 
McDaniel 
Sparks 
Clapper 
Allen 




CHI DELTA PHI 



oLlt 



erar 



<J 



MEMBERS 



Mary Virginia Allen 

Ruth Allen 

Mary Elizabeth Clapper 



Mildred Bennett 
Kaye Markee 
Frances McDaniel 
Sara McNeill 



Margaret Ward 
Luella Robinson 
Betty Lee Woodcock 



Female intellects who have maintained a 2.0 
average in Freshman English and who have had a 
manuscript accepted by the sorority are eligible 
for membership in Chi Delta Phi. Having be- 
come a member of the honorary group, the co-ed 



can submit other writings for criticism and use 
her critical taste on sisters' literary efforts. The 
purpose of the organization is to foster interesting 
writing on the campus. 



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[ 110 ] 



Uft 




Nunnelley 

Smith 

Auston 

McKnight 

Patterson 

Thornton 

Massey 

Dolvin 



Pass 

Brock 

Stanton 

Meadows 

Anderson 

Sherrer 

Thornton 



DIETETICS 



MEMBERS 



Gene Bee 
Jimmie Dolvin 
Louise Massey 
Marie Nunnelley 
Mary Nell Pass 
Gene Smith 



Mary Ellen Thornton 
Eunice Ward 
Janyce Ward 
Martha Anderson 
Mildred Bennett 
Marlene Brock 



Elizabeth McKnight 
Martha Patterson 
Glenna Sherrer 
Mary Auston 
Carolyn Thornton 
Anita Meadows 



The organization gives dietetics majors a chance 
to pursue further their research in nutrition and 
table service. In wartime when eating becomes 
business-like and involved in vitamins, the im- 
portance of the group is magnified. Meeting not 
only to learn but also to practice, the Dieticians 



help in luncheons on the campus. The biggest 
project undertaken was the making of eighty 
pounds of fruit cake at Christmas time. One of 
the most enjoyable meetings was an initiation ban- 
quet which Mrs. Elizabeth Seay and Mrs. John 
Xan, former dietetics teachers, attended. 



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Lee 

Jordan 

Sibley 
Johnson 




KAPPA PI 



M 



OFFICERS 



President Ralph Johnson 

Vice-President Luella Robinson 



Secretary Bobbie Nichols Jordan 

Treasurer Juanita Milam Kaylor 



Ralph Johnson 
Luella Robinson 
Bobbie Nichols Jordan 
Juanita Milam Kaylor 
Jane Bennett 



MEMBERS 

Sue Smith 
Jeanette Burleson 
Helen Cagle Sibley 
Kleob Lucas 

HOU'ARD KlRKLAND 



Mary George Mangum 
Joe Clancy 

(Honorary Member) 
Alida Townes 
(Sponsor) 



A branch of the national art fraternity, Kappa 
Pi is an inducement for art students to develop 
their talents seriously. The select group who 
compose this organization meet to encourage 
and criticize each other's work. Miss Townes, 
faculty advisor, is helpful to the group because 
of her interest in her pupils as well as in her art. 



Each month this year Kappa Pi has sponsored 
an exhibit in the library, the first of which was 
Ralph Johnson's and the last, Luella Robinson's. 
Kappa Pi also had an exhibit in the city library. 
Ralph Johnson won second place in a national 
water color contest this vear. 



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[ "2 ] 




Masquers During 
Production 



MASQUERS 



^LJramati 



LC5 



Alon Bee 
Vance Vernon 
Herman Cobb 
Wesley Anderton 



MEMBERS 

Antoinette Sparks, Faculty Advisor 

Elwood Newman 
Carroll Trotter 
Edna Jo Medlin 
Margaret Ward 
Jane Murphy 



Margaret Lee Monroe 
Martha Patterson 
Clayton Gilbert 
Martha Anderton 



It takes work to get into this organization and 
when one has made it he may rest assured that 
something has been accomplished, at least in the 
line of dramatics. A sum of ten points must be 
accumulated before membership may even be 
considered and then the endorsement of the group 
must be gained. Points may be obtained by writ- 



ing plays, by acting in major Masquer produc- 
tions, by directing, and by working backstage. 
Many of our best Masquers never felt the foot- 
lights. 

If you are interested in dramatics, set Mas- 
quers as your goal. 



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Eddleman 
Dowel I 
Gwin 
Franklin 
Hurtt 
Smith 
Lowrcy 
Cook 
Charles 
Lovegren 

Wilcox 
Cooper 
Friel 

Godwin 
Xan 




CHI ALPHA SIGMA 



Ck 



emiiim 



Harry Charles 
Gene Cook 
Flonnie Cooper 
Arthur Dowell 
Elvia Eddleman 
Thomas Franklin 



MEMBERS 

Nellie Friel 
Mary Gilliland 
Margene Graham 
Doris Godwin 
Carey Gwin 
Oscar L. Hurtt 



Norman Lovegren 
Dan Lowery 
Billy Smith 
Robert Thompson 
Dr. Wilcox 
Dr. Xan 



One of the truest and most difficult to attain 
honors on the campus is membership in Chi 
Alpha Sigma, honorary chemistry fraternity. To 
qualify one must keep his grades well above "C" 
level and must be struggling toward a major 
in chemistry. 

Chi Alpha Sigma's charter requires four meet- 
ings per semester. At these meetings qualified 



speakers keep the members informed of the de- 
velopments in the chemical world. 

This year Chi Alpha Sigma found itself in the 
extremity of arriving at the end of the semester 
with only two meetings behind it. With much 
bustle and concern the required quota was ar- 
ranged and held all in one week. 



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•*#<wt'v-\'s''^ *^* 




Eddleman 
Gwin 
Chisolm 
Xan 
Richards 
Wilcox 
Charles 
Gordon 

Markee 
Hayes 
Graham 
Godwin 
Gilliland 
Franklin 
Reinhardt 

Hagood 
Cooper 
Posey 



ALPHA EPSILDN DELTA 

P~-W 



Active Members 
Harry Charles 
Jack Chisolm 
Flonnie Cooper 
Elvia Eddleman 
Darlene Franlin 
Mary Gilliland 
Doris Godwin 
Eugene Gordon 



MEMBERS 

Margene Graham 

Carey Gwin 

Martha Hagood 

Mary Frances Hays 

Kaye Makee 

Ira Patton 

Elizabeth Watson Posey 

Bobbie Reinhardt 

Dick Conerly 



Active Alumni 
Dr. Leon Richards 

(Faculty Advisor) 
Dr. Harold E. Wilcox 
Dr. Ruth Berrey 

Honorary Member 
Dr. John Xan 



Although knowledge of this organization is 
limited almost entirely to Science Hall "bugs", 
A. E. D. is one of the most enthusiastic and 
active organizations on the campus. Its mem- 
bership naturally is made up of those who con- 
centrate on the natural sciences, and who hope 
to render a service to humanity. 

Since its organization in 1926, A. E. D. has 
seen many of its members become successful doc- 
tors, teachers, nurses, and housewives. Its aim, 
enveloped in the motto, "Truth I Pursue," is to 



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promote a better spirit of understanding among 
premedical students. Members of A. E. D. are 
not entirely confined to studying but enjoy 
many social and educational gatherings during the 
year. Included in this year's activities were the 
animal party honoring freshman prospects, ini- 
tiation of several new students, initiation of 
pledges, monthly meetings at which well-known 
men spoke, the annual Spring Banquet, and, of 
course, those incessant gatherings of members to 
discuss problems and gab in the Chapter room. 



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^Jke 






Mrs. Martinson directs 
the Girls' and Boys' Glee 
Clubs in an informal re- 
hearsal at Pine Lodge. 



BOYS GLEE CLUB 



OFFICERS 

President... . — — _ Fred Halbrooks 

Vice-President j EDDY Lu. ES 

Secretary ... Charles Mitcheli 

Librarian.. __ __ ___.Edsel Hand 

Reporter .... ...Paul Kluge 

MEMBERS 

Harold Barnes Gerow Cole Paul Kluge Wilford Provo 

Carl Brakefield Gene Cook Joe Bill Knowles Davis Weaver 

Clark Burkhalter Douglas Davidson Norman Lovegren Ernest Wheeler 

Oscar Causey Ralph Edfeldt John Pitchford Carl Whirli y 

GIRLS GLEE CLUB 



OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Librarian 

Reporter 



Jean Buchanan 

Bette Jane Houlditch 

... Margaret Roper 

Martha Patterson 

Frances Duki 



Shirley Anderson 
Mildred Bennftt 
Marjorie Bentley 
Louise Bohanon 
Jean Buchanan 
Sara Chisolm 
Marjorie Corbin 



Elaine Deni.i y 
Frances Duke 
Martha Lou Fagan 
Sara Florence 
Theresa Franks 
Louise Hardin 
Ann Joni >, 



MEMBERS 

Mary Ann Jone s 
Jo Ann Jordan 
Mary George Mangum 
Louise Massey 
Anita Meadows 
Edna Jo Medlin 
Virginia Mi h \i i i i 



Margaret Morton 
Margie Jean Orr 
Ri x \h Pittman 
Mary Ruth Riddick 
Mary Hi len Sartain 
Nonie Simons 
Janyce Ward 



Margari t Ward 
I Y\i tte Williams 
Jane Claire Wood 
Katherine Wren 
Mary Louise Wren 
Ai vs Yoe 
Jane Murphy 



[ 116 ] 



GLEE CLUBS 



A CAPPELLA CHDIR 

OFFICERS 

President Paul Kluge 

Vice-President Bettye Prince 

Secretary -Jo Ann Jordan 

Librarian Edsel Hand 

Assistant Librarian Myrtice Thomason 

Reporter ___ Bette Jane Houlditch 

MEMBERS 

Marjorie Bentley Martha Lou Fagan Louise Massey 

Jean Buchanan Louise Hardin Edna Jo Medlin 

Sara Chisolm Bette Houlditch Virginia Mehaffey 

Marjorie Corbin George Jackson Margaret Norton 

Gene Cook Ann Jones A. D. Neal 

Robert Cork Jo Ann Jordan Doc Wesson 

Douglas Davidson Paul Kluge Carl Whirley 

Francis Duke Jeddy Liles Jane C. Wood 

Elvia Eddleman Norman Lovegren Imogene Wootan 

Ralph Edfelt Elizabeth McKnight Pianist: Ann Jones 



Green, Brakefield, Provo, Liles, Wesson, Cork, Cook, Hand, Kluge 

McRae, Eddleman, Pearson, Davidson, Whirley, Lovegren, Walker, Edfeldt, Medlin, Woods 

Ward, Morton, Sargent, Fritsch, Martinson, Orr, Massey, Ward, Prince, Chisolm 

McKnight, Patcerson, Jordan, Fagan, Petrea, Houlditch, Buchanan, Wood, Hardin, Bentley, Thomason, Jones, Duke 




XI 




During Freshman Registra- 
tion the B.S.U. does its best 
to help make Frosh feel at 
home. In one end of the 
Gym a booth is set up to 
offer refreshment to thirsty 
registrants. Here we see the 
cup of Kool-Aid being en'oyed 

There are few Big Things 
that can happen to a campus 
in B.S.U. work. One of 
these is the annual Retreat 
for state officers. This year 
Howard was host to the 
meeting which was attended 
by leaders in B.S.U. on col- 
lege campuses all over the 
state. 



BAPT 




President 

Enlistment Chairman 

Co-Chairman 

Social Chairman 

Co-Chairman 

Devotional Chairman 

Co-Chairman 

Postei Chairman 

Bulletin Board 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Prayer Room Chairman 

Music Chairman 

Baptist Student Magazine.. 
Faculty Ad i nor 



.. Ray Atchison 

Vivian Langley 

Joyce Brown 

.Martha Hagood 
..-John Pittman 

.... George Jackson 

... Carolyn Garrick 

...Sue Patrick 

Harold Barnes 

Y. L. Anthony 

Sara Williams 

Frances Dorn 

Eyra Dell Petri \ 
..Ralph Longshore 
Dr. Davison 



REPRESENTATIVES 

Kiihama (Local Dept.) Virginia Mehaffey 

Ruhama (Girls' S. S.) Mary Gilliland 

Ruhama (Boys' S. S.) James Sharman 

Training Union Director Mary Pearson 

Woodlau n Baptist Church ... Polly Cochran 

Calvary Baptist Church Jean West 

Mission Group __.Wilford Provo 

Ministerial Association Mabry Lunceford 

Y. W. A. Cathryne Word 

W. C. V _ _ Annie Lee Golden 

Reporter Gerald Tidwell 



1 18 



LVKrrJ 



The long-time missing link of campus life was 
supplied, when the Baptist Student Union came 
into being. The B.S.U. purposes to form a con- 
nection of the Baptist student to the college 
church and to encourage Christian living on the 
campus. By bringing into one all of the organi- 
zations connected with the Baptist church the 
group finds strength in unity. With an annual 
welcoming party for freshmen, an April Show- 
ers Banquet, a Mexican Fiesta, and Sunday night 
Friendship Circle, the B. S. U. provides Christian 
fun for the school. At Morning Watch oppor- 
tunity is given for the student body to begin 
each school day with thought and prayer. The 
Prayer Room in the Student Activity Building 
is available to all students and serves as a silent 
call to worship. In these and many other ways 
the Baptist Student Union reaches out and min- 
isters to the individual student. 




Dr. Davison has come to be well beloved by the members of the 
B. S. U. Not only is he faculty advisor to the council, but the personal 
friend and counsellor to every student who seeks his aid. An authority 
on love, Dr. D. can give you tips on how to handle your problem. 

Sue Patrick and two boys from the Mission. There is a little Mission 
over the hill sponsored by the B. S. U. The little children there are 
provided a Sunday School, Prayer Meeting, and interested friends. There 
is no church building, but service rendered under the sky is acceptable 
to Him. 



1ST STUDENT UNION 



Longshore, Lunceford, Provo, Coggin, Barnes. 

Patrick, Knight, West, Cochran, Garrick, Williams, Dorn, Gilliland, Word, Petrea, Hagood. 

Brown, Golden, Jackson, Atchison, Langley, Anthony, Davison. 




V - 






f*\ 










McLeod 
Whiting 
Cochran 
Langley 
Franks 
Sartain 

Stamps 
Shelby 
Golden 
Brown 
Word 




Women CHRIS 1 1 A N Volunteer 



OFFICERS 



Annie Lee Golden ^President 

Gladys Stamps Vice-President 

Annette McLeod Secretary-Treasurer 



Mary Helen Sartain Program Chairman 

Mary Pearson Reporter 

Polly Cochran / ,,• .-./ 

_ „ V Mission Chairmen 

Carolyn Garrick \ 



Annie Lee Golden 
Gladys Stamps 
Annette McLeod 
Mary Helen Sartain 
Mary Pearson 
Polly Cochran 
Carolyn Garrick 



MEMBERS 

Cathryne Word 
Theresa Franks 
Mildred Blankenship 
Doris Shelby 
Hildred Ellis 
Joyce Brown 
Sue Patrick 



Mary Virginia Allen 
Katherine Hall 
Martha Lou Fagan 

Nell Allen 

Margaret Ann Sargent 

Vivian Langley 



Girls who have offered or are willing to offer 
themselves for Christian service are potential 
Women Christian Volunteers. The group is or- 
ganized to give co-eds a chance to crystallize 
their religious ideals, whether in sponsoring a mis- 
sion Sunday School or giving the proverbial cup 
of cold water on the campus. They are ac- 
cused of being the P.W.V., Preachers' Wives 
Volunteers, which proves that more than one of 



O 



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Howard's organizations can give promise of fu- 
ture usefulness. 

At the bi-weekly meetings reports are given of 
Christian service rendered; leaders in Christian 
activity over the city speak. 

The members of Women Christian Volunteers 
want anything but the stigma of being called 
straight-laced religionists. Their aim is practical, 
visible, modern Christianity. 



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Row 1: 

Davidson, Hall brooks 
Trotter, Green 
Gilbert, Bean 
Powell, Hargrove 
Crow 
Row 2: 

Whirley, Lu nee ford 
McRae, Sinclair 
Beasley, Arnold 
Crosby, Prichard 
Jackson, Bryan 
Kelley, Anthony 
Wofford 
Rou 3: 

Pope, Sanderson 
Adams, Vernon 
Duke, Ray, Moon 
Davis, Chambliss 
Morrison, Rector 
Row 4: 

Nelson, Wheeler 
Little, Crowder 
Bundurant, Potts 
Culbreth, Jackson 
Barnes, Morris, Casey 
Rou- 5: 

Brock, Homan, 
Wooddy Longshore 
Wilson, Knowles 
Liles, Harper 
luhnson. Brown 
Tidwell, Ashley 
Brown, Coggin 
Malone, Provo 
Seals, Burkhalter 
Hicks, Marler 
Stephenson , Moore 



MINISTERIAL ASSDCIATIDN 



MINISTERIAL STUDENTS 



Billy Hopson Adams 

Yancfy Lamar Anthony 
Earl M. Arnold 
Harold Barnes 

Curtis Monroe Bean 
Jimmy Beasley 

Mason Bondurant 
Thomas Brock. 
George Brown 
Robert Brown 
Sigurd Bryan 

Clarke Burkhalter 
B. W. Carter, Jr. 
Guy Casey 

Hugh Chambliss 
Herman Wilson Cobb 
James Coggin 
Edgar Crosby 

William Crowder 



Bill Culbreth 

Douglas Davidson 
Willie Jack Davis 
Nelson Duke 
Al Garner 
Clai ion Gilbert 
Edgar Glaze, Jr. 
Fred Halbrooks 
Mallie Hargrove 
Forrest Hicks 
John Higdon 

Donn Emil Hill 
James Hollis 
E. C Houston 
Edward Jackson 
George Jackson 
Kimball Johnson 
Pace Kelley 

Joe Bill Knowles 



James Liles 
Cecil Little 

Ralph Longsore 
Mabry Lunceford 
Harold Malone 
Lewis Marler 
Donald McRae 
Glenn Miller 
Lloyd Moon 
P. B. Moorf 
Hugh Morris 

Frank Morrison 
Angus Neel 
Terrell Nelson 
Clarence Phillips 
Milton Pope 
Earl Potts 
Henry Powell 
Wilford Provo 



Hubert Ray 
George Rertor 

Harold Rhodes 
Leon Riddle 
Excell Roberts 

Paul Sanderson 
Ted Seals 

Leon Walter Spain 

Billy Stephenson 
George G. Threadcill 

Girald Tidwell 
Bruce Todd 

Carroll Trotter, Jr. 
Vance Vernon 
Carl Whirley 

Woodrow Wilson 
Ernest Wheeler 
Verrel Wofford 



To maintain understanding among the preach- 
ers and to keep them informed about what goes 
on in the ministry, the Ministerial Association 
meets each Tuesday night. A pastor from some 



church in the state at every meeting instructs the 
preacher boys about what they may expect from 
Baptist churches and prepares them for circum- 
stances that will have to be dealt with. 



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Pagan, Bennett, 
Langley, Patterson 
Monroe, Franklin 
Word, Howell 
Gatsis, Allen 
Patrick, Garrick 
Peeples, Hagood 

Medlin, Brock 
Brown, Golden 
Anderton, Cochran 
Williams, Petrea 




Y. W. C. A. CABINET 



OFFICERS 

Mary Virginia Allen. President Martha Patterson Secretary 

Martha Anderton... ...First Vice-President Annie Lee Golden... Treasure, 

Edna Jo Medlin.. Secoml Vice-President 



MEMBERS 



Cathryne Word 
Eyra Dell Petrea 
Betty Davis 
Sara Scott 
Joyce Brown- 
Jane Murphy 
Jane Baker 



Margaret Lee Monroe 
Carolyn Garrick 
Mary Elizabeth Clapper 
Bette Jane Houlditch 
Frances Galbreath 
Mildred Bennett 
Polly Cochran 



Katherine Wri nn 
Sue Patrick 
Martha Hagood 
Sara Peeples 
Glenna Shi.rri r 
Sara Howell 
Vivian Langi i ■> 



Darlene Franm i\ 
Sara Williams 
Marlene Brock 
Eero Gatsis 
Ruth Allen 
Martha Lou Fagan 
Miss Myra Dunham 
Faculty Advisoi 



The Y. W. C. A. seeks to fulfill its purpose 
of promoting growth in Christian character and 
service through physical, social, mental, and spir- 
itual training. The organization sponsors regu- 
lar monthly programs at which outstanding civic 
leaders speak. This year a Red Cross Nutrition 
Class was sponsored by the group. The Y. W. 
C. A. promotes fellowship among all women 



students through a number of socials and sponsors 
certain service activities at Thanksgiving and 
Christmas, as well as taking part in numerous 
benefit campaigns. The "Y" is the only campus 
religious organization which is interdenomina- 
tional. Its activities are planned and executed by 
the Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 



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[ 122 I 




Bryan, Morris 
Beaird, Wheeler 
Coggin, Provo 
Weaver, Crow 

Pickens, Crosby 
Harper, Hicks 
Jackson, Crowder 
Anthony, Burkhalter 
Ray, Patton, McRae 

Potts, Gilbert 
Wooddy, Pittman 
Culbreth, Chapman 



Y. M. C. A. CABINET 



MEMBERS 



Dr. Chapman 
Bill Culbreth 
Clayton Gilbert 
Donald McRae 
Mack Harper 
Cecil Little 
Lionel Patton 



Robert Woody 

Page Kelley 

Ed Crosby 

Joe Bill Knowles 

Gladstone Pickens 

Wilford Provo 

Sigurd Bryan 



William Hicks 
Hubert Ray 
Clarke Burkhalter 
Davis Weaver 
Earl Potts 
Hugh Morris 
Ernest Wheeler 



John Pittman 
Y. L. Anthony 
William Beaird 
George Jackson 
Harold Rhodes 
Jon Crow 
Billy Crowder 



Seeking to unite men students and to pro- 
mote Christian understanding regardless of de- 
nomination, the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion welcomes all men into its membership. The 
general idea of the organization is to be helpful 
both to the members and the whole campus. 



The most beneficial service rendered this year 
was the bringing of Dr. Sherwood Eddy, world 
traveler, lecturer, and writer, to speak in chapel. 
With the help of the Y. W. C. A. a neat sum 
of money was procured for the World Student 
Service Fund to help struggling students in war 
hit nations. 



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[ 123 ] 



Butler 
DcLay 

Bohanon 

Lawrence 

Crow 

Henley 

Blankcnship 

Hall 

Thornton 

Parker 

McKav 

Corbin 

Bee 

Culotta 

Word 

Brown 

Allen 

Fagan 

Jordan 

Weaver 

Bradshaw 

Riddick 

Dolvin 

Thomason 

Apperson 

Williams 

Wells 

Kirk 

Boyles 

Copeland 

Pass 

Garrick 




a \ j ff 



FRESHMAN "Y 



MEMBERS 



Twink Wells 
Norma Lou Kirk 
Doris Boyles 
Mary Copeland 
Mary Nell Pass 
Nell Brown 
Nell Allen 
Martha Lou Fagan 
Jo Anne Jordan 
Bonnie Ruth Weaver 



mozelle bradshaw 
Mary Ruth Riddick 
Jimmie Dolvin 
Fannie Ruth Thomason 
Marjorie Apperson 
Hilda Butler 
Mavis Delay 
Louise Bohanon 
Mildred Lawrence 
Lois Crowe 



SPONSORS 



Peggie Henley 
Mildred Blankenship 
Katherine Hall 
Mary Ellen Thornton 
Elaine Parker 
Jean McKay 
Marjorie Corbin 
Gene Bee 

Constance Culotta 
Billie Madge Word 



Sara Williams 



Carolyn Garrick 



The Freshman "Y" Commission is a part of the 
regular Y. W. C A. yet it is an organization 
within itself. 

If you've been on the campus in recent years, 
you have heard of "Speak Week." This week is 
sponsored by the Freshman "Y" girls each year. 
The idea of "Speak Week" was a brain child of 
Martha Merck, past president of the Y. W. C. A. 



It has steadily grown in popularity. The friendly 
spirit on our campus promoted "Speak Week" and 
"Speak Week" continues to promote the friendly 
spirit there. 

The Freshman girls have proved themselves 
very useful this year. Sponsors for this group 
are Sara Williams and Carolvn Garrick. 



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[ 124 ] 



I .#*. 







Crow, Gilbert, 
Knowles, Sanderson 
Wooddy, Jackson 
Pickens, Provo 
Burkhalter, Weaver 
Crowder, Anthony 
Ray 

Gilliland, Pearson 
McLead, Atchison 
Sargent, Shelby 
Knight, Brown 
Garrick, Cochran 
Golden 



MISSION GROUP 



OFFICERS 

Wilford Provo, President 



Ray Atchison 
Joyce Brown 
Sigurd Bryan 
Clark Burkhalter 
Guy Casey 
Polly Cochran 
Jimmy Coggin 
Jon Crow 



MEMBERS 

Billy Crowder 
Hildred Ellis 
Carolyn Garrick 
Clayton Gilbert 
Mary Gilliland 
Annie Lee Golden 
George Jackson 
Joe Bill Knowles 



Annette McLeod 
Mary Pearson 
Wilford Provo 
Hubert Ray 
Margaret Ann Sargent 
Davis Weaver 
Sara Williams 
Robert Wooddy 



Meeting to learn the what and wherefores of 
missions, the Mission Group hears those who have 
propagated somewhere in the world the Chris- 
tian message. Speakers tell something of their 
experience and usually add a plug for mission 
work in general. 



Dr. Frank Woodward, Mr. Cecil Ward, and 
Dr. Jones, all returned from China, presented 
the Chinese evangelistic and educational history 
and possibilities. Dr. Carson described the mis- 
sion fields in Nigeria; Dr. Thompson told about 
that field in Birmingham; Mr. Burkette spoke 
about his work with Jews in the city. 



T 



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[ 12! 1 



Tidwell. 
Morris 
Anthony 
Pickens 

Stephenson 
Killian 
Homan 

Van Popering 




HOUSE OF KILLIAN 



B. W. Carter 
Hugh Morris 
Billy Stevenson 



MEMBERS 

Dave Homan 
Charles Niager 
Harold Barnes 
Harold Malone 



Gladstone Pickens 
Gerald Tidwell 
Y. L. Anthony 



The most unique and least organized organiza- 
tion on the campus is the noble House of Killian. 
A conveniently heated house, a dictatorial Moth- 
er Killian, a medley of more or less students make 
an ordinary rooming house into an extraordinary 
fraternity. The medley, perhaps more nearly jam 
session, is overbalanced by preachers, varying in 



degrees of piosity. At the end of school, the 
only one unpastorizing was Wendell Givens, who 
was not, however, the leas: of these. The or- 
ganization is relatively simple, having only one 
officer. Treasurer Ma Killian collects rigorously 
and in return bestows all the comforts of home, 
including maternal advice. 



[ 126 ] 




HEY mCREftSEO RTTENDRNEE AT THE FOQTBfill GAME HRRD WENT 

TO THE FBIR 





5.U. RURERTS 



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ON THE CAMPUS 

Row 1 — Where's Hammie?; Where's Del?; Where's Ralph?; Coo. 

Row 2 — Find your pix, boys?; Smith Hall route to class; Lambda Chi's convene; Here's Ralph. 

Row 3 — Oh, how I hate to get up; Country boy shows out; X marks the spot; Hold that line, Dot. 




a 



t HOWARD 



Row 1 — Menagerie — Fried Mule and Lamb-da Cow; Isn't that sweet? Posing; Unposing — Rats! 

Row 2 — Our Prexy grits his teeth; Aw shux, now; Fakin'!; The Real McCoy. 

Row ) — Ye-ed; Let's have some Jive; Snake coiled; Open house. 




DN THE CAMPUS 

Row 1 — Brawn; They gotta guy; The Triumvirate. 

Row 2 — Camp Hill; Close communion; Smile, Efro; Mabry and the Missus. 

Roil' 3 — Top o' the world; That's showing partiality, Louise; The Dales at a Sigma Nu tea; You can 

tell where her heart is. 




a 



t HOWARD 



Ron 1 — Roomies on a roof-top; Fakin' again; Drizzle. 

Row 2 — Natural habitat; Pastor's conference; Comin' thru; "Snitz." 

R uu ; — Tussle; The harem narrowed down and singled out; Fried Mules; Drape shape. 




DN THE CAMPUS 

Rou 1 — The Assistant Editor hard at work; It must be Sunday; Nup, not a crap game; K. P. 

Row 2 — The funnies; Glama; Alpha Delta prize. 

Rou 3 — Whut fur?; B. S. O.'s got the honor; Ah Chew. 

Rou 4 — Memoirs; Inside Dope; Hoomilyatin', ain't it? 




a 



t HOWARD 



Ron / — Scholar; The Chainomatic; The Shadow; You can do this on Campus. 

Row 2 — Stare-steps; Organic; How do you account for that? 

K„„ 3 — Glamour Man; Human side of Chemists; Ever meet this gentleman?; Bees among the corn-shux! 

K „ 4 — Self explanatory; Now who laid him down to sleep?; Leap, Frog. 




&5ut, babu, took 



^Jhe 



F A V 




1. Martha Andcrton; 2. Mary Virginia Allen 
3. Carroll Trotter. 



4. Sue Smith; 5. Mabry Lunceford; 6. Vi- 
vian Langley; 7. Ray Atchison. 



a 



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at mem now: 



/ 



D H I T E s 




8. Betty Brooks; 9. John Pittman; 10. Caro- 
lyn Garrick; 11. Dudley Watkins. 



12. Marlene Brock; 13. James Sharman; 14. 
Margaret Ward; 15. Carl Whirley. 



A 



R 



D 



^4 l/[/oman3 oLast \J\Jom — 

Looking back over the book and over the year of your life and mine 
that it holds, I find that it is all chock full of war. If the heart and soul, 
at least the aim, of it is not peace and the belief in peace, then the thing 
isn't worth the printing. Peace is more important than war, and our 
education is for life — not death. When you think of this book, I would 
have you think of peace and foreswear yourself to the construction of 
the world rather than its destruction. 

But it's done, now — delivered into the hands of you, my fellow 
students. There are possibly things herein that you don't like. Lots of 
them we don't like either. Your picture may not appear as much as 
you like, but we have you there. In January we warned you. After all 
this is your publication. Read page 1, if you don't believe it. 

No joking though, we have few complaints to make that have 
not already been made, and many thanks to give. Many of you have 
been totally indispensable to the publication. There are friends outside 
the student body like Mr. Faerber, the engraver; Mr. Missildine, the 
printer; Mr. Falkenberg of the Alabama Theatre; Mr. Townsend of the 
NEWS: and lots of others that you never heard of, yet to whom we 
owe so much. All of which doesn't even touch on our advertisers whom 
we have termed OUR PATRONS. 

Well, here's that last word — May the God of my trust bless you 
and keep you, and be to you what He has been to me this year in trans- 
forming the impossible into the actual and real. 








TO OUR PATRONS 




Kuhama, symbol of the Solid Rock upon 
which to stand these days. To our patrons 
we give our thanks and pay our homage. 



WTLAAJLV. 




J 




ou/ara K^otteae 



f 



From the halls of Howard College to the missions of the world, 
We will fight our Father's battles with the flags of Christ unfurled. 
Persecution and temptation, we may suffer greatest loss; 
But we'll carry on regardless for we're soldiers of the cross. 

Take the Word as our weapon and we'll charge into the foe, 
Fighting hard the tribulation as onward we shall go. 
With our Captain from the heaven guiding us with His command, 
We will carry Christianity 'round the world to all the Land. 

When our fighting days are over, 
And we reach our home to rest, 
We'll be given our citations 
Bv our Leader, Christ the blest. 



Tune: THE MARINE HYMN 
Words by Hugh Morris, '45 




The World Needs 

Educated 

Workers 

Never before in the history of the 
United States have such opportunities 
been offered to those who are trained 
for office work, both with the Govern- 
ment and industry. 



Prepare to do the type of work for which the world is begging. 
Many employers prefer college-trained young people. A Wheeler 
Secretarial training supplies the link between a college training 
and a good position. 



Wheeler has helped hundreds of college graduates to bridge the 
gap and find a market for their college education. Forty-eight 
colleges were represented in our 1!)42 enrollment. Ask for book- 
let, "Looking: Ahead". 



WHEELER BUSINESS COLLEGE 

Elevator Entrance — 1911 First Avenue 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



56th Year 



"Wheeler Students Get The Best Positions" 



V-5eautu Section, photoaraphs of 

Miss Betty Brooks 

Miss Aileen Murphy 
Miss Gene Smith 

Miss Louise Massey 

Miss Martha Anderton 
Miss Bobbie Rhinehart 
Miss Garline Frankun 
Miss Mary Copeland 
Miss Jimmie Dolvin 
Miss Efro Gatsis 

Miss Dorothy Perkixson 



Are From 



Home of ' 


'DRAMATIZED" 


Photogrophy ^^^ 


i 


MtWftCft 


II ° /ijL 


m^l^H 


% 


B^ 


y '^^A wE* 


/Ctudios 




^ 


BIRMINGHAM 


ALABAMA 





BAKE WITH 




~ ROLLER 

CHflmpion 


cc 


"The Flour the Best 
Cooks L/se" 

Distributed By 

)SBY-HODCES MILLING C 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 


o. 



COMPLIMENTS 
O F 




1916 Fifth Ave., N. 
Phone 3-7181 




Use 
Alabama's Best 

COKE 

A. B. C. 

COKE 



Phone 4-6533 



Wedding Invitations 

and Personal Stationery 

Qenuineh Engraved 



PRINTING & BINDING 

LITHOGRAPHING - ENGRAVING 

OFFICE SUPPLIES OFFICE FURNITURE 

RUBBER STAMPS & SEALS 

PRINTED ADVERTISING & COMMERCIAL ART 



ROBERTS & SON 

"Birmingham's Oldest Business House" 
520-30 S. 19th St. Phone 3-7121 



Where Howard Students Meet 

LANIER DRUG CO. 

Corner 80th and 2nd, South 
Richard I. Lanier, Prop. 



Natural Gas 



SERVICE . . . for home or industry 
CLEAN 

EFFORTLESS 

HEALTHFUL 

ECONOMICAL 
Consult your local Gas Company 

Southern Natural 
Gas Co. 

Birmingham, Ala. 



Compliments 



Brown-Service 



Compliments of 

O. D. ELLARD 

VARIETY STORE 

School Supplies - Fresh Candies 

8 N. 77th Street 9-9271 















Southern Headquarters for 

LABORATORY EQUIPMENT 

AND SUPPLIES 

McKesson & Robbins, Inc. 

Birmingham, Ala. 




Compliments of 

Brilliant Coal Co. 

First National Bldg. 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Producers of Genuine 

Brilliant Coal 

The South's Finest Fuel 
Lump - Egg - Nut - Stoker 

A Size for Every Domestic Use 
















ZAC SMITH 

STATIONERY COMPANY 

Printing — Engraving 

Drawing Instruments 

Office Furniture 

Visible Records 

Everything Used in an Office 

2014 First Ave., 
Birmingham, Ala. 




MEET your friends at 




Bowdens 

"We Serve the Best of Everything" 
7702 2nd Ave. So. 

Lunches - Cold Drinks - Candy 
Cigars - Cigarettes 










Compliments of 

JAFFE JEWELRY CO. 

121 North 20th Street 
Phone 3-445 6 
















Compliments of 

Ten Ball Novelty & Mfg. Co. 

106 N. 18th Street 4-3351 
ROCKOLAS FOR RENT 

Complete Stock of Columbia, Victor, Decca, Bluebird, 
and Okeh records for sale. 




Compliments of 

Sokol Bros. Furniture Co. 

A Friend of Howard College 

Come By and See Us 

1818 First Ave., N. 
















Be always at your best. At the 
first sign of fatigue, take a mom- 
ent to relax. Our delicious, 
sparkling beverages will refresh 
you — give you quickly the added 
energy you need. 



Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Orange Crush-7Up Bot. 

Co. 
B'ham Nehi Bottling Co. 

Buffalo Rock Co. 
Dr. Pepper Bottling Co. 

Try-Me Bottling Co. 
Double Cola Bottling Co. „ „ , 

New Yorker Beverage 

Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. Co. 

Barq's Bottling Co. 



Wood-Fruitticher 
Grocery Co. 



WHOLESALE 
GROCERY 



2321 1st Avenue, North 
Phone 3-3111 Birmingham, Ala. 



Compliments of 



GREENWOOD CAFE 



Prop., Arthur Greenwood 



407 North 20th Street 



Compliments of 

FRIEDMAN JEWELRY CO. 

12 5 North 19th Street 
Phone 3-5672 



Liberty National Life 
Insurance Co. 



Birmingham, Ala. 



FRANK P. SAMFDHD, President 



Compliments 



W. C. VICE 



FUNERAL HOME 



OKIE DOKIE 

New — Modern 
Birmingham's Up-to-Date 

SANDWICH SHOPPE 



JOBE-ROSE JEWELRY CO. 

1917 Second Ave. 

Birmingham, Alabama 

JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS 

of Quality 



Compliments of 



Hill Grocery Co. 



Birmingham, Ala. 



f^ats L^c 



onuene 



'Twas the night before burning 
When all thru the lab 
Not a live cat was stirring 
Not even a dab. 

Their spirits came forth, though 
With nary a balk 
"Tonight is our last night 
So let us now talk." 

The}' gathered around 
All the tables with care 
While one raised a window 
To give them some air. 

They talked of their torture 
On back and on face 
And how we cut on them 
Was quite a disgrace. 

They thought and they thought 

Of what they might do 

To rightfully show us 

Just what they'd been through. 

Beatrice suggested a noose 
For her man 
But first she preferred 
He be put in the can. 

Junior said "Friends, 
I will take to the gun 
That's the surest way 
For what they done done." 

Now Doris though shy 
Had a noticeable frown. 
Her wish for her masters 
Was that they might drown. 



Messershmidt, thinking hard 
Of her mutilated tail, 
Decided there was really 
No place like a jail. 

Piffle Snitz, purring 
A sad little tune 
Thought of the ax 
And heads to be hewn. 

One silent cat who 
Had several names 
Conceived that her superiors 
Should go up in flames. 

Then came other spirits, 
With a sigh and a heave. 
Thev were cats of our pals 
Who decided to leave. 

Because they were spared 
More time than the others 
They decided they would only 
Just freeze our brothers. 

With plans all finished 
And everything in order 
They got in their cars 
To escape to the Border. 

Two things they forgot, though 
It's really a scream — 
You've heard it so much 
TIRES and GASOLINE! 



A Bue. 



1842 



1943 



HOWARD COLLEGE 

The pace of war has quickened. July 1, 1943, Howard 
receives its first quota of trainees in the Navy V-12 Program. 

The College, like all others which have the V-12 Program, 
will be in session constantly, covering in terms of sixteen weeks 
three full semesters of work every twelve months. This is the 
best system for acceleration yet devised. By it even the average 
student completes his full college course in thirty-two months 
and superior students complete it in twenty-six or twenty- 
eight months. 

It is patriotic to get as much education as you can before 
entering the armed services. 

All the regular courses customarily offered in peace-time 
will be given as usual. 

For details write to 

HARWELL G. DAVIS, President 

Howard College 

Birmingham, Alabama 



GOLDEN FLAKE 

PRODUCTS 

Always Good — All Ways 

POTATO CHIPS SALTED PEANUTS 

PEANUT BUTTER SANDWICHES 

MIXED NUTS, CANDY, ETC. 

MAGIC CITY FOOD 
PRODUCTS CO. 



PATRONIZE 



OUR 



ADVERTISERS 



'-rt . Q S^v, X^-m. **«■ ~^** ^Aj-c^Jo_<jvv i^cxjl/v* C, O^vfrv (u^Aj»Qorv* 



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